Catholic Educators

Picture of Anne Marie Mongoven

Sister Anne Marie Mongoven (1927 - ) is a member of the Dominican Sisters of Sinsinawa, Wisconsin.  She has made significant contributions to the field of catechesis. At the national level she contributed to National Catechetical Directory, Sharing the Light of Faith, approved by the bishops of the United States in 1979; at the diocesan level in Madison, Wisconsin she was the associate director of religious education as catechetics was beginning to be recognized as an important endeavor in the Church; at the collegiate level at Santa Clara University, she created and taught in a holistically integrated catechetical program; at the parish level she was especially attentive to the formation of catechetical leaders.  As a scholar, she has authored books and articles, contributed to videos, been a lector and a consultant to bishops, dioceses and religious publishers. 

Biography

Sr. Anne Marie Mongoven, O.P. was the oldest of five children born to Mary O'Connor Mongoven and Thomas Patrick Mongoven. Born December 21, 1927 in Chica­go, Illinois, she lived most of her childhood in an Irish Catholic neighborhood in Resurrection Parish on the West Side of Chicago.

The Mongoven children in Sr. Anne Marie's family were Thomas Patrick, born 1930, Sally Jo, (1932), John (Jack) O'Connor, (1938), and Terence Philip, (1943). Anne, Thomas, and Sally Jo all began their schooling at Resurrection School on the West Side of Chicago.

Anne Marie Mongoven was enrolled in first grade at Resurrection School in Chi­cago in September 1931 at the age of four. At that time her mother, Mary, had two other children at home and enrolled Anne Marie in first grade so that she would not have the care of three children at home under the age of four.  Resurrection did not have a kindergarten in those days and the agreement was that Anne Marie could remain in first grade for two years. However, she was soon reading, writing and doing arithmetic with the best of the other students and so she was promoted to second grade the following year. She continued with this class throughout elementary school.

Sr. Anne Marie describes her childhood as "blissful and extraordinarily happy." (A. M. Mongoven, personal communication, April 16, 2012). She notes that, "Church for us was never the build­ing we gathered at for prayer and worship. The Church extended into every nook and cranny of our lives, including our geography. The neighborhood was so Catholic that one day the children gathered together to see what the new neigh­bors who were not Catholic looked like” (A. M..Mongoven, personal communication, April 16, 2012).  

There were no public schools in the neighborhood, no city library, no other churches nor any synagogues. Everyone was Catholic and everyone on the "block" celebrated every baptism, first communion, wedding and ordination, of which there were many. All acknowledged death by putting a large "crepe" of flowers at the outside of the front door and all gathered for wakes and funerals. It was all of “one piece, and though we were missing the larger part of life--unity with other groups--we grew up with an experience of Church that was extraordinarily intense and personal. Our identity was Church"(A. M..Mongoven, personal communication, April 16, 2012).   Anne Marie’s experience of community identified with the church had a lasting effect on her fundamental notion of catechesis.

Although Anne Marie lived during the Great Depression, her father had steady work as a printer for the Chicago Tribune, a company for which he worked in different positions all of his adult life. In 1941 because of her father’s professional advancement the family moved farther west, to St. Giles parish in Oak Park and the family bought its own home. Her brothers and sisters all went to St. Giles School. Anne Marie went to Trinity High School in River Forest, graduating in 1944.

In 1944 Anne Marie enrolled in Rosary College in River Forest, Illinois. It was dur­ing this year that she discovered her love for study and interest in theology. During this year the witness of the Sister’s lives as Gospel women of learning, women of wit and wisdom led her to enter the Sinsinawa Dominicans where she was professed in 1947 with the name of Sister Thomas A’ Becket. She received her BA degree, majoring in English and education from Edgewood College in Madison, Wisconsin in 1958.

From 1947 to 1966 she taught in Catholic elementary schools staffed by the Sinsinawa Dominicans in Minneapolis, Madison, Washington D.C., and Omaha.  She was principal of St. Anne School in Wausau from September 1957 to July 1963.  From September 1966 until June of 1968 she taught religion at Edgewood High School. 

In 1966 Anne Marie earned her Master of Arts degree from Catholic University of American in Religious Education after completing a thesis entitled: “The Development of the Concept of Divine Retribution in the Old Testament.”  In 1982 Anne Marie earned a doctorate from Catholic University of America in Catechetics.  Her dissertation was written under the direction of Berard L. Marthaler, OFM, Chair of the Religious and Religious Education Department, School of Religious Studies and entitled: “The Relationship Between Revelation and Catechesis in ‘Sharing the Light of Faith.’”

Anne Marie attributes much of her passion for “echoing” the faith to her experience of community growing up in an Irish Catholic community on the west side of Chicago where “we played together, went to Mass together, celebrated First Communions and mourned deaths together.  The neighborhood was one extended family” (A. M..Mongoven, personal communication, April 16, 2012).  As her life unfolded, Anne Marie’s passion, scholarship and creativity expanded and deepened and is best articulated in her book, The Prophetic Spirit of Catechesis: How We Share the Fire in Our Hearts.

Anne Marie’s scholarly work and her own spirituality were highly influenced by the Constitution on Divine Revelation from the Second Vatican Council. Articles two through six gave her an entirely new understanding of revelation as God’s self-communication to humankind. The commentary by Joseph Ratzinger (Pope Benedict XVI), drew her to study the first chapter on Divine Revelation very carefully.  Her deeper understanding of revelation was further enhanced by an extraordinary class at Catholic University conducted by Avery Dulles, S.J.

Anne Marie sees her understanding of revelation as described by the Church as a basis for all we know about God and, therefore, a basis for catechesis of both children and adults.  She began to use the theological method of beginning with human experience and the signs of the times in the light of the Church’s life, its teaching and tradition, its liturgical life, its nature as a community of love, and its commitment to social justice as forms of catechesis that interpreted both the experiences and the signs of the times.  This methodology was initiated by Fr. Marie Dominique Chenu, O.P. and modified and developed in different ways by Fr. Yves Congar, O.P., Fr. Edward Schillebeeckx, O.P. and Fr. Karl Rahner, S.J.  This methodology that was the basis for her jointly written catechetical series, Living Waters (Mongoven, Gallagher, 1992).

Besides the writings of Vatican II and the scholars noted above, Anne Marie was also influenced by three people who contributed in significant ways to her thinking and understanding of catechesis.  Rita Claire Dorner, O.P. Ph.D. made a great impact on Anne Marie’s work by reading and reviewing her writings and asking probing questions which brought about further clarifications in her thinking and her teaching.  Steve Privett, S.J. Ph.D., as a student and colleague, stretched her imagination and asked unexpected questions which caused her to rethink some of her assumptions and premises.  Berard Marthaler, O.F.M., a professional consultant to the National Catechetical Directory Committee and chair of the graduate program in Religion and Religious Education at the Catholic University of America recognized Anne Marie’s creative and scholarly abilities and offered her a scholarship to accomplish her doctoral work.  He was a “grand evaluator” of Anne Marie’s scholarship and an initiator of new ways of thinking about catechesis.

Anne Marie’s professional associations, both formal and informal, have also contributed to her own development and have been a way she found to serve the larger educational community. Throughout her life Anne Marie was a member of many professional organizations and served on many boards and committees both at Santa Clara and beyond. She was elected to two terms to the Board of Trustees at Rosary College, River Forest, Illinois (Dominican University) 1989 and 1993, and served on the Academic Affairs committee of the Board.

Anne Marie was also elected to a three year term of the Executive Board of the Association of Professors and Researchers of Religious Education, the most prominent scholarly society for Religious Education/Catechetics in the United States and served from 1989-1992.  She co-chaired the annual meeting of the organization in 1986.

Anne Marie was always known to be an excellent teacher. On April 3, 1992 she received an award from Santa Clara University “for outstanding achievement in teaching, research and service in the Department of Religious Studies.”  Her “Exceptional Creative and Scholarly Activity” was recognized in an award given by Peter Facione, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences on March 10, 1993.  While Anne Marie’s most significant and influential teaching years perhaps happened at Santa Clara, she also taught at Edgewood College, Madison, Wisconsin (1973-74); St. Michael’s College, Winooski, Vermont (1983); Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. (1974, 1979, 1981); Holy Cross Abbey, Canon City, Colorado (1979); and Institute of Pastoral Ministry, Immaculate Conception Seminary, Huntington, New York. The passion with which Anne Marie taught was contagious and her students recognized the significance of the readings and assignments they were given—they were meant to lead to a conversion, a change of heart, so that they would realize what it meant to be engaged in the self-revelation of God.

Sr. Anne Marie Mongoven, O.P. and Sister Rita Claire Dorner, O.P. were honored “for their exceptional leadership in establishing the superb Pastoral Ministry program” with a permanent endowed scholarship program set up in their names by Santa Clara University in March 1996.

From the time she began her graduate work in the 1960s, if not before that, it is hard to separate Anne Marie’s life-- her biography--from the influence she had on catechetics in the United States and beyond.  Over the next three decades, Anne Marie continued and deepened her commitment to and understanding of catechesis through research, teaching, consulting and writing.  While genuinely rooted in scholarship, her approach always was applicable to everyday situations.  She tried to have a positive difference in the faith lives of all she touched.  She empowered parish catechetical leaders to design and implement effective programs for children and adults.  Anne Marie is currently Professor Emerita at Santa Clara University, continues to study and write, and lives at the Sinsinawa Dominican Motherhouse, Sinsinawa, Wisconsin.

Works Cited

Mongoven, A. M. (1982). The relationship between revelation and catechesis in “sharing the light of faith.” (Doctoral dissertation Catholic University of America, Washington D.C. 1982).

Mongoven, A. M. (1967). The development of the concept of divine retribution in the old testament (Master’s Thesis, Catholic University of America, Washington D.C. 1967).

Mongoven, A. M. (2000). The prophetic spirit of catechesis: how we share the fire in our hearts. New York NY: Paulist Press.

Mongoven, A. M., Gallagher, M. (1992). Living waters. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Ratzinger, J. (1967-1968). Dogmatic constitution on divine revelation, origin and background. In: Vorgrimler, H. (ed), Commentary on the documents of Vatican II. New York: Herder and Herder.

United States Catholic Conference. (1979). Sharing the light of faith: National catechetical directory for Catholics of the United States. Washington: United States Catholic Conference. Dept. of Education.


Contributions to Christian Education

From July 1968 to June 1973 Anne Marie was the associate director of Religious Education for the Diocese of Madison, Wisconsin. During that time she acted as a consultant to Bishop Cletus F. O'Donnell in the analysis of drafts of the writing of a Bishops' document entitled Basic Teaching of Catholic Religious Education (1973). Sister Anne Marie's work on this document led to her appointment to the National Catecheti­cal Directory committee, a committee of twelve persons including four bishops, one religious brother, three lay persons, and two women religious. Each of these twelve persons represented one of twelve geographic divisions of the Bishops Conference and was responsible under the leadership of Monsignor Wilfrid Paradis and Sister Mariella Frye, SHMN for the writing of the National Catecheti­cal Directory, Sharing the Light of Faith, approved by the bishops in 1978 and published in 1979.

Anne Marie’s contributions to Sharing the Light of Faith are best summarized by Berard Marthaler, OFM Conv., who as General Consultant attended every meeting of the Working Committee that drafted Sharing the Light of Faith.  He has said that there are few pages in the document that do not have Sister Anne Marie’s finger prints. Marthaler adds that her vision of catechesis as a principal ministry of the Church closely linked to the liturgy greatly influenced other members of the Committee. In the case of the National Directory as in much of her career Anne Marie’s greatest contribution, he says, though often anonymous, was her keen grasp of issues and indefatigable energy. (Berard Marthaler OFM Conv., personal communication, November 29, 2012).

 After the Directory was completed Sister Anne Marie published a book, Signs of Catechesis: An Overview of the National Catechetical Directory (1979). In the Spring of 1979, Anne Marie was selected as one of four “Outstanding Leaders in Religious Education” by the National Catholic Reporter.

In 1975 Anne Marie moved from Madison, Wisconsin, to Washington, D.C. in order to begin doctoral studies in the Religion and Religious Education De­partment at the Catholic University of American. In 1982, she finished her doctorate having written a dissertation on The Relationship Between Revelation and Catechesis in `Sharing the Light of Faith’ (1982). 

In 1982 Anne Marie accepted the position at Santa Clara University to design and be the director of a new Graduate Program in Pastoral Ministry.  She began to analyze the needs and expectations of the university and the local Church of the Diocese of San Jose. There she designed the curriculum for the program which included degrees in the areas of Catechetics, Pastoral Lit­urgy, and Spirituality as specialty areas for degrees. Later, a fourth degree area, Liturgical Music, was added to the program. The program opened in the Fall Quarter of 1983 with 39 registrations. By 1998 when Anne Marie retired the class registrations totaled several hundred students.  Anne Marie directed the Graduate  Program for thirteen years, and re­mained as a faculty member teaching theology and catechetical courses.  In 1985 Anne Marie received the Fr. Thomas Terry Award from Santa Clara University to facilitate writing a book on symbolic catechesis. This would be published subsequently as The Prophetic Spirit of Catechesis: How We Share the Fire in our Hearts (2000).

While at the University of Santa Clara, Sister, Anne Marie co-authored a catechet­ical series for children in grades one through eight with Maureen Gallagher, Ph.D. This series included the writing of textbooks for each grade, two different teachers’ guide for each grade, and supplementary materials. The major differ­ence in this series, called Living Waters (1992), from other children's programs was that it did not start with the traditional focus on creed, sacraments, commandments and prayer, but rather it started with human experience and incorporated what Anne Marie would later call symbolic catechesis.

In this series each unit of four weeks began with the analysis of a child’s experience of a particular age (one week); and then it examined that experi­ence from the point of view of Sacred Scriptures (one week); after that exploration, the child’s experience was seen through the lens of the teachings of the Church and the example of the saints (one week); ultimately the experience was celebrated through the liturgical and devotional prayers of the Church (one week).  All these different lenses shed new meaning on the original experiences and deepened the children’s ability to connect their lives with the symbols of their faith and thus bring deeper meaning to their faith lives.

This process added richness to the children’s faith life as they began to see the interconnectedness of all life.  The children could identify with the heroes and heroines of the past in a way that motivated them to acts of justice and kindness in the present.  This integrated approach was based on the “conviction that God, the Holy Mystery, is always present in our lives.  Every human experience is a possible experience of God. God cannot be known outside of or apart from human experience” (Mongoven & Gallagher, 1992).  Anne Marie goes on to point out that human experience does not stand alone. “We look at our ordinary human experiences and consider how God’s self-communication through the Church and the world enlightens us as to the religious dimension of our experiences.” (p. iv, Mongoven & Gallagher, 1992).

Anne Marie expanded on the catechetical process embodied in the Living Waters series, called “symbolic catechesis,” in her book The Prophetic Spirit of Catechesis, How We Share the Fire in Our Hearts, published in 2000. The book received the “First Place” award for educational books from the Catholic Press Association in 2001. This book has been used not only in Catholic catechetical programs, but also in many other Christian seminaries and colleges. 

The Prophetic Spirit of Catechesis (Mongoven, 2000) is divided into two parts: The Foundations of Catechesis and The Process of Symbolic Catechesis.  The first deals with the nature of catechesis, recent history, relevant Church documents since Vatican II and a theology of catechesis.  The second focuses on connecting life to faith using the words and symbols of Scripture, Church teachings and the lives of the saints, and the rich symbols found in prayer and liturgy. In the Afterword, Anne Marie (2000) impressively connects prophets and catechists.  She notes: 

“Catechists like prophets look at the signs of the times in daily life, personal and social and they turn to the symbols of faith for interpretation.  They lead their community to look at the signs of the times in light of their Christian faith…Through the word in their lives the word in their mouth, catechist stir up the heart and stretch the minds of their listeners so they may lead them to an ever stronger faith.” (p. 276)

Both in Living Waters (Mongoven & Gallagher, 1992) and in The Prophetic Spirit of Catechesis (Mongoven, 2000) Anne Marie highlights the role and importance of the catechist:

“The catechist is the minister of the Church, the one who witnesses to faith, the one who expresses the Church’s care and the church’s wisdom. The ultimate effect of catechesis depends on the catechist and on the grace of God.” (p. vii, Mongoven & Gallagher, 1992).

The Prophetic Spirit of Catechesis (Mongoven, 2000) was reviewed positively by Caroline Renehan in Irish Theological Quarterly; by Regis Duffy, O.F.M. in America; and by Jeanette M. Lucinio, S.P. in New Theology Review.

Caroline Renehan, a Senior Lecturer and Head of Religious Studies and Religious Education in the Faculty of Education at St. Patrick’s College, Drumcondra, Dublin, Ireland, reviewed The Prophetic Spirit of Catechesis: How We Share the Fire in Our Hearts (Mongoven, 2000). She notes how one is ‘immediately confronted with the realm of mystery, the mystery of God, Christ and the Church” (p. 412, Renehan, 2002). The mystery ultimately unfolds in community, a community mandated “to bring about the Reign of God, which is the core of every catechist’s being” (p. 412, Renehan, 2002). Renehan points out that Anne Marie’s theology of catechesis is ground in Dei Verbum. She recognizes that the core of the author’s work is found in her process of symbolic catechesis.  Renehan (2002) recognizes in Anne Marie’s work that “we have now arrived at a catechesis for the twenty-first century.  It is an all-embracing way of being-in-the-world.  Symbolic catechesis integrates life and faith symbols in a harmonious, dialogical, critical and thought provoking way.  Such a catechesis involves the person and the community in a searching for truth and identity, not abstract truth but the truth of Christian life” (p. 412, Renehan, 2002).

Regis Duffy, a scholar-in-residence at the Franciscan Institute, St. Bonaventure University, St. Bonaventure, NY in his review of The Prophetic Spirit of Catechesis (Mongoven, 2000) notes that Anne Marie’s “careful discussion of the Second Vatican Council’s ‘Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation’ draws out the implications for symbolic catechesis, in which the Christian community links the symbols of daily life with those of God’s presence.  The catechists themselves are a symbol of God’s self-communication to the community as they work together “as graced searches for meaning.”(p. 32, Duffy, 2000).  Duffy notes that the symbolic catechetical approach “is not a theological construct, but a pastorally practical way of engaging people in the living out of their faith” (p. 32, Duffy, 2000). 

Duffy (2000) concludes by saying: “Perhaps the best compliment I could pay to the author is simply to say that her book will renew the enthusiasm of anyone involved in any form of catechetical ministry and deepen their awareness of how much remains to be done if the pastoral reforms of Vatican II are to be accomplished.  But I would not restrict the readership to catechists.  Anyone who wishes to be well informed about the needs of the church in this new century will welcome this book” (p. 32).

Jeanette M. Lucinio, S.P., from the Catholic Theological Union in Chicago reviewed The Prophetic Spirit of Catechesis (Mongoven, 2000) and noted that Anne Marie has been a prophetic voice in the field of catechesis since this ministry’s renewal in the 1970s.  Lucinio explains how Anne Marie in a clear storytelling manner brings to light the Vatican II catechetical documents along with the appropriate liturgical works of the Council.  She notes how Anne Marie “echoes the clarion call that catechesis is a prophetic ministry. The prophets were people who disturbed others, by the power of their words and actions.  Catechists are prophetic with fire burning in their hearts that change lives, grace people and make them free.”(p. 94, Lucinio, 2002).  Lucinio (2002) states that “many will profit from her clear insights and compelling invitation to a deeper understanding and appreciation of the catechetical ministry of the Church.” (p. 94).

Catherine Dooley, O.P. retired associate professor in the School of Theology and Religious Studies at Catholic University of America, Washington D. C. and an author of many catechetical materials describes Anne Marie Mongoven’s remarkable ability to bring theory and practice, faith and life, together. This is evident both in her teaching and in her writing.  In The Prophetic Spirit of Catechesis (Mongoven, 2000), she presents not only a theology of catechesis but a practical approach described as symbolic catechesis, a process based on the dimensions of the Christian life: communal life, the teaching of the apostles, the works of justice, and community prayer.  One of the most significant aspects in this approach is the focus on the liturgy and the liturgical symbols because “most of catechetical ministry is related to liturgical experience.”   Together with the theory, she offers a process that prepares people of all ages to enter more fully into the sacramental and liturgical life (Catherine Dooley, O.P, personal communication, November 22, 2012). 

 

Rita Claire Dorner, O.P. a colleague of Anne Marie’s and former Director of the Pastoral Ministry program at Santa Clara describes Anne Marie’s contributions to the field of catechetics under five headings.  1) Anne Marie’s understanding of the foundation of catechesis emerges from her study and appreciation of the first chapter of the Constitution on Divine Revelation (Ratzinger, 1967-1968) where revelation is described as God’s self-communication to humanity. 2) Anne Marie gives considerable importance to liturgy in the life of the Church so that participation is liturgy is seen as an integral component in the catechetical process and Christian life. 3) The Ministry of worship is linked to the ministry of service in her writings, so that the final sending forth at Mass, “Go and serve the Lord” is completed with “Thanks be to God.” 4) In her catechetical sessions Anne Marie gives priority to ritual prayer as integral to the session and life of the Christian Community.  Each section in Living Waters (1992) contains a scripted ritual which enables the children to pray together. 5) Anne Marie’s liturgical presentations demonstrate a rich understanding of symbol and ritual based on the writings of Karl Rahner, S.J.  She grounds these understandings in the nature of liturgy itself.  For Sister Rita Claire the intimate connection to liturgy is the strongest characteristic of Anne Marie’s approach to catechetics. (Sister Rita Claire, personal communication, November 21, 2012)

Stephen A. Privett, S.J. President of the University of San Francisco sums up Sr. Anne Marie’s contribution to the field of catechetics by stating:

“Anne Marie Mongoven may be accurately termed as "the loyal opposition" to anything contrary to the Gospel.  She has served the Word of God tirelessly throughout her years as a Sinsinawa Dominican sister and a professional career in catechetics.  She was one of the authors of the National Catechetical Directory, which laid down the principles, framework and guidelines for post-Vatican II catechesis in the United States.  Her books and articles have all aimed to build-up the Church on the solid foundation of scripture, liturgy, tradition and doing justice.   Among her more enduring legacies is the graduate program in Ministry at Santa Clara University, which she established and thoughtfully nurtured for over fifteen years.   Hundreds of church ministers around the world have benefited from the programmatic initiatives that she launched during her tenure at Santa Clara, including a very popular summer session that gave students access to the best in Catholic thought and practice.  She is the quintessential woman of the Church who "spoke truth to power" from a deep personal well of faith, hope and charity.   In recognition of Anne Marie Mongoven's significant service to the Catholic Church, contributions to the discipline of Catechetics and status as the quintessential Catholic scholar, the University of San Francisco conferred upon her an honorary degree in 2002” (Stephen A. Privett, S.J., personal communication, November 19, 2012).

Works Cited

Duffy O.F.M., Regis. (2000). Faith Meets Life. [Review of the book The prophetic spirit of catechesis, by A. M. Mongoven, O.P.]. America, p. 32.

Lucinio S.P., J. (2002). [Review of the book The prophetic spirit of catechesis, by A. M. Mongoven, O.P.].  New Theology Review, 15(1), 93-94.

Mongoven, A. M. (1979). Signs of Catechesis: An Overview of the National Catechetical Directory. New York, NY: Paulist Press.

Mongoven, A. M. (2000). The prophetic spirit of catechesis: How we share the fire in our hearts. New York: Paulist Press.

Mongoven, A. M., Gallagher, M. (1992). Living waters (Texts and catechist guides grades 1-6) Allen, TX, Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M., Gallagher, M., Bitney J. (1993). Image (grade 7 & catechist guides).  Allen, TX, Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M., Gallagher, M., Bitney J. (1993). Quest (grade 8 & catechist guides). Allen, TX, Tabor.

Ratzinger, J. (1967-1968). Dogmatic constitution on divine revelation, origin and background. In: Vorgrimler, H. (ed), Commentary on the documents of Vatican II. New York: Herder and Herder.

Renehan, C. (2002). [Review of book The prophetic spirit of catechesis, by A. M. Mongoven, O.P.] Irish Theological Quarterly, 67, p.411.

The National Council of Catholic Bishops. (1973). Basic Teaching of Catholic Religious Education. (Unpublished Booklet).

United States Catholic Conference. (1979). Sharing the light of faith: National catechetical directory for Catholics of the United States. Washington: United States Catholic Conference. Dept. of Education.


Bibliography

Thesis and Dissertation.

Mongoven, A. M. (1967). The development of the concept of divine retribution in the old testament (Unpublished Master’s). Catholic University of America, Washington D.C.

Mongoven, A. M. (1982). The relationship between revelation and catechesis in “sharing the light of faith.”. (Unpublished Doctoral). Catholic University of America, Washington D.C.

Books

Mongoven, A. M. (1979). Signs of Catechesis: An Overview of the National Catechetical Directory. New York: Paulist Press.

Mongoven, A. M. (2000). The prophetic spirit of catechesis: How we share the fire in our hearts. New York: Paulist Press. (This book was awarded first prize by the Catholic Press Associa­tion for Education books published in 2000.)

Book Chapters

Mongoven, A. M. (1997). The directories as symbols of catechetical renewal. In Dooley, C., & Collins, M. (Eds.), The Echo Within: Emerging Issues in Religious Education. Allen, TX: Thomas Moore.

Mongoven, A. M., Dorner, R. C. (1982). The celebrant must be there. In Funk, V. (Ed.), The NPM Commentary on Music in Catholic Worship (55-58). Washington, D.C.: Pastoral Associates

Text Books

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M. (1992). Living waters 1. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M. (1992). Catechist guide for living waters 1, Catholic school edition. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M. (1992). Catechist guide for living waters 1, Parish edition. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M. (1992). Living waters 2. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M. (1992). Catechist guide for living waters 2, Catholic school edition. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M. (1992). Catechist guide for living waters 2, Parish edition. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M. (1992). Living waters 3. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M. (1992). Catechist guide for living waters 3, Catholic school edition. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M. (1992). Catechist guide for living waters 3, Parish edition. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M. (1992). Living waters 4. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M. (1992). Catechist guide for living waters 4, Catholic school edition. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M. (1992). Catechist guide for living waters 4, Parish edition. Allen, TX: Tabor

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M. (1992). Living waters 5. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M. (1992). Catechist guide for living waters 5, Catholic school edition. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M. (1992). Catechist guide for living waters 5, Parish edition. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M. (1992). Living waters 6. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M. (1992). Catechist guide for living waters 6, Catholic school edition. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M. (1992). Catechist guide for living waters 6, Parish edition. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M.; Bitney J. (1993). Image 1, 2, 3: Catechist guide grade seven . Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M.; Bitney J. (1993). Image 1, 2, 3: Catechist guide of Image 1, 2, and 3; Catholic school edition. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M.; Bitney J. (1993). Image 1, 2, 3: Catechist guide of Image 1, 2, and 3; Parish edition. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M.; Bitney J. (1993). Quest 1, 2, 3: Catechist guide grade eight. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M.; Bitney J. (1993). Quest 1, 2, 3: Catechist guide of Image 1, 2, and 3; Catholic school edition. Allen, TX: Tabor.

Mongoven, A. M.; Gallagher, M.; Bitney J. (1993). Quest 1, 2, 3: Catechist guide of Image 1, 2, and 3; Parish edition. Allen, TX: Tabor

Articles

Mongoven, A. M. (1975). Horace Bushnell: Early american advocate of family catechesis. The Living Light, 12(4), 537-547.

Mongoven, A. M. (1979). The directory: A word for the present," The Living Light, (16)2,135-148.

Mongoven, A. M. (1980). From ashes to Easter. Liturgy: The Calendar, 1(2), 90-91.

Mongoven, A. M. (1981). The people will set the agenda. New Catholic World, 1.

Mongoven, A. M. (1985). Catechists and liturgists: Can we bring them together?. Pace (Professional Approaches to Christian Education), 15.

Mongoven, A. M. (1985). Every catechist is a spiritual guide. The Catechist's Connection, 1(4).

Mongoven, A. M. (1986). Catechesis and parish life: Interpreting the Notre Dame study." The Living Light, 22, 295-303.

Mongoven, A. M. (1987). Catechesis and Liturgy. Worship, 61, 248-257.

Mongoven, A. M. (1987). Dominicans as catechetical ministers. Dominican Ashram, 118-127. Nagpur, India

Mongoven, A. M. (1988). Schorsh, Sister Dolores. In The New Catholic Encyclopedia. (Vol. 18). Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America.

Mongoven, A. M. (1989). Twenty-five years of 'The Living Light': A retrospective. The Living Light, 25, 295-304.

Mongoven, A. M. (1990). The Notre Dame study: Implications for parish religious education. Chicago Studies, 29, 73-86.

Mongoven, A. M. (1992). Catechetics in the 90's: Present state and future challenges. Chicago Studies, 31, 229-243.

Mongoven, A. M., Dorner, R. C. (1978). The celebrant must be there. Pastoral Music, 2(6).

Book Reviews, Review of:

Mongoven, A. M. (1985). [Review of the book A pilgrim people: Learning through the church year, by J. H. Westerhoff Ill]. Religious Education Journal, 80, 656-658.

Mongoven, A. M. (1985). [Review of the book Revelation and its interpretation, by A. Shorter]. The Living Light, 21(1), 367-368.

Mongoven, A. M. (1986). [Review of the book Foundations for a practical theology of ministry, by J. N. Poling, D. E. Miller]. Religious Education Journal, 81, 502-503.

Mongoven, A. M. (1988). [Review of the book Nuns and the education of american catholic women, 1860 – 1920, by E. M. Brewer]. America, 159, 354-356.

Mongoven, A. M. (1988). [Review of the book Personal commitment: Beginning, keeping, changing, by M. A. Farley]. America, 159, 354-356.

Mongoven, A. M. (1989). [Review of the book The pastoral vision of archbishop Robert E. Lucey, by S. A. Privett, S.J]. The Living Light, 25,184-185.

Mongoven, A. M. (1989). [Review of the book Women at the well: Feminist perspectives on spiritual direction, by K. Fisher]. Religious Education, 84(4), 629-630.

Mongoven, A. M. (1990). [Review of the book educating in faith: Maps and visions, by M. Boys]. Worship, 64(2), 186-87.

Mongoven, A. M. (1990). [Review of the book Of many paths: A catholic approach to religious pluralism, by E. Hillman]. Religious Education, 87, 632-633.

Mongoven, A. M., Jonte-Pace, D. (1990). [Review of the essay Women and evil, by N. Noddings]. Religious Education, 85, 478-481.

Papers, etc.

Mongoven, A. M. (1978, January). National catechetical directory, sharing the light of faith. Archdiocesan or Diocesan Religious Education Conference, Mobile, IN.

Mongoven, A. M. (1978, March). National catechetical directory, sharing the light of faith. Archdiocesan or Diocesan Religious Education Conference, New York, NY.

Mongoven, A. M. (1978, March). National catechetical directory, sharing the light of faith. Archdiocesan or Diocesan Religious Education Conference, Sinsinawa, WI.

Mongoven, A. M. (1978, November). National catechetical directory, sharing the light of faith. Archdiocesan or Diocesan Religious Education Conference, Peoria, IL.

Mongoven, A. M. (1979, May). National catechetical directory, sharing the light of faith. Archdiocesan or Diocesan Religious Education Conference, Detroit, MI.

Mongoven, A. M. (1979, August). National catechetical directory, sharing the light of faith. Archdiocesan or Diocesan Religious Education Conference, Canton, OH.

Mongoven, A. M. (1979, August). National catechetical directory, sharing the light of faith. Archdiocesan or Diocesan Religious Education Conference, Youngstown, OH.

Mongoven, A. M. (1979, September). National catechetical directory, sharing the light of faith. Archdiocesan or Diocesan Religious Education Conference, Washington, D.C.

Mongoven, A. M. (1979, September). National catechetical directory, sharing the light of faith. Archdiocesan or Diocesan Religious Education Conference, Lansing, MI.

Mongoven, A. M. (1979, September). National catechetical directory, sharing the light of faith. Archdiocesan or Diocesan Religious Education Conference, Kansas City, KA.

Mongoven, A. M. (1979, October). National catechetical directory, sharing the light of faith. Archdiocesan or Diocesan Religious Education Conference, Niagara Falls, NY.

Mongoven, A. M. (1979, October). National catechetical directory, sharing the light of faith. Archdiocesan or Diocesan Religious Education Conference, Kalamazoo, MI.

Mongoven, A. M. (1979, November). National catechetical directory, sharing the light of faith. Archdiocesan or Diocesan Religious Education Conference, Honolulu, HI.

Mongoven, A. M. (1982, July). Cateclietical Ministry and Adults. St. Michael's College Summer Lecture Series, Winooski, Vermont.

Mongoven, A. M. (1984, May). Women and the Church. Panel member Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA.

Mongoven, A. M. (1984, June). The Relationship of Catechesis and Liturgy. Thirteenth Annual Conference on Liturgy and Religious Education, Notre Dame University, Notre Dame, In.

Mongoven, A. M. (1986, January). Catechesis for eucharist & Eucharist as action of the church. San Francisco Archdiocesan Religious Education Institute, San Francisco, CA.

Cassette Tapes Published:

Mongoven, A. M. (Speaker). (1978). Christian Initiation: A Model for Catechesis [Audio Recording]. Kansas City, Kansas: New Life Films and Cassette Publishers.

Mongoven, A. M. (Speaker). (1979). The Local Church [Audio Recording]. Kansas City, Kansas: New Life Films and Cassette Publishers.

Mongoven, A. M. (Speaker). (1979). The Local Church as Catechist [Audio Recording]. Kansas City, Kansas: New Life Films and Cassette Publishers.

Mongoven, A. M. (Speaker). (1979). The Local Church as Celebrator [Audio Recording]. Kansas City, Kansas: New Life Films and Cassette Publishers.

Mongoven, A. M. (Speaker). (1979). The Local Church as Mystery [Audio Recording]. Kansas City, Kansas: New Life Films and Cassette Publishers.

Video Script

Mongoven, A. M.; Moynahan, M. (1996-1997). Video Script: Echoes of Faith. United States Catholic Conference, Washington, D. C.


Excerpts from Publications

Mongoven, A.M. (2000). Prophetic spirit of catechesis: How we share the fire in our hearts. New York: Paulist Press.

 The Process is the Content in Symbolic Catechesis

Symbolic catechesis involves a process that is itself a living out of Christian faith.  In the apostolic era the Christian was one within a community of people who professed Jesus as Lord, gathered on Sunday for “the breaking of the bread,” prayed daily, severed the poor and those in need, and accepted the evangelizing word preached by the apostles (Acts 2:42-46). They were one in faith, holy in prayer and works of justice, catholic in reaching out to everyone, and apostolic in professing the gospel the apostles preached.  Symbolic catechesis integrates these actions of being one, holy, catholic, and apostolic in its process.  The process is the content of catechesis.  The process of symbolic catechesis is itself a living out of Christian faith. (p.139).

What draws adults together for symbolic catechesis are the life concerns they have in common and the faith that they share.  For adults particular experiences, such as the death of a loved one, the stress of rearing children, the loss of a job, moving to a new community far from family and friends, bring them to seek counsel or to turn to their faith for understanding and strength.  The question What is going on in my life, and how do I live with it? may not be articulated, but it leads people to join groups that are concerned about the same interests or concerns.  For faithful people these issues often move them to join social or volunteer groups, but if their parish community seems at all interested in such concerns they may turn to it. (p. 139-140)

 

Mongoven, A. M. (1997). The directories as symbols of catechetical renewal.  In Dooley, C. and Collins, M. (eds.). The Echo Within: Emerging issues in Religious Education, Allen TX: Thomas Moore.

When Mary Charles Bryce, O.S.B., wrote that the twentieth century “might legitimately be called a ‘catechetical century,’ a time of catechetical resurgence,” she did not exaggerate.  The renewal and organic development of the twentieth-century Roman Catholic Church’s understanding of catechetical ministry are as extraordinary and startling as is the renewal of systematic theology or biblical studies or liturgical theology during that same century.

… the amazing and organic development of catechetical renewal in this century has been recapitulated in several significant church documents: particularly in an official document mandated by the Second Vatican Council: The General Catechetical Directory. The directory is significant not only because it was mandated by the council, but also because it is the result of extensive consultation with episcopal conferences and catechetical scholars throughout the world.  It expresses and recapitulates the main points of catechetical renewal developed during the twentieth century. (p. 131-132)

The general directory synthesizes and articulates the organic renewal of catechesis that has taken place in the twentieth century.  It emphasizes that catechesis is a ministry of the word which “leads both communities and individual members of the faithful to maturity of faith” (Art. 21). The faith of which the directory speaks is a “lively faith”; it is a “gift of God which calls people to conversion” (Art. 22). (p. 134)

Works cited

Sacred Congregation for Clergy (1971) General catechetical directory. Washington DC: United States Catholic Conference. 


Recommended Readings

Mongoven, A. M. (1992). Catechetics in the 90's: Present state and future challenges. Chicago Studies, 31, 229-243.

This issue of Chicago Studies focused on “CCD: Religious Education in the Parish,” and Mongoven’s article is the culminating entry, introduced by the editors as describing “the astonishing range of approaches to religious education and catechesis that exist in American Parishes.  The article begins with an overview of the Notre Dame Study of Catholic Parish Life,” with emphasis on how Catholic parishes are formed and some different ways in which they are approaching catechesis in the parishes today.

 

Mongoven, A. M. (1987). Catechesis and Liturgy. Worship, 61, 248-257. 

            Mongoven’s article acknowledges that one of the central aspects of catechetical renewal is its organic relationship to liturgy.  She notes that both the General Catechetical Directory and the National Catechetical Directory, Sharing the Light of Faith, emphasize the relationship.  Anne Marie rightly notes that “The full, conscious and active participation in the liturgy parallels the living, conscious and active faith sought in Catechesis.”  She critiques the works of Thomas Groome and Gilbert Ostdiek as inadequate for a full integration of catechesis and liturgy.

 

 Mongoven, A. M. (1979). The directory: A word for the present," The Living Light, (16)2,135-148. 

            Mongoven outlines the five unifying principles of Sharing the Light of Faith: 1) a common vision of the goal of catechesis—growth in faith for both individuals and communities; 2) the four tasks of catechesis—to proclaim Christ’s message, to build and participate in community, to lead people to prayer and to motivate them to serve others, 3) a focus on adult catechesis, 4) an emphasis on the importance of experience in catechesis, 5) the prominence of the community which catechizes.  Anne Marie notes that “the Good News of the gospel calls us to die to self so that we may rise in Christ.  The directory says in many words what the gospel says in a few.”

Mongoven, A. M. (1985). Catechists and liturgists: Can we bring them together?. Pace (Professional Approaches to Christian Education), 15

            Mongoven focuses on how to bring catechists and liturgists together by first describing their various missions and their commonalities.  She notes the history of the two ministries were separate and names some of the stereotypes associated with both ministries including gender realities which reinforced the divide. To bridge the gap between the two ministries, Anne Marie suggests graduate schools and diocesan offices can do some cross training and have some common bibliographies and study groups. Anne Marie also calls for bringing together the liturgical and catechetical ministries at the parish level and notes, “it is only if we live the Gospel in our mutual relation (catechists and liturgical ministers) with each other that we can really begin to renew the church we are called to serve and through the church the face of the earth.”

 


Author Information

Maureen Gallagher

 

Maureen Gallagher received her Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin in Madison, Wisconsin, in Adult Education and Management.  She currently is a senior consultant for The Reid Group serving many faith based organizations in the area of planning, leadership searches and leadership formation.

Biola University
13800 Biola Ave. La Mirada, CA 90639
1-562-903-6000