Protestant Educators

Picture of Findley B. Edge

FINDLEY BARTOW EDGE (1916-2002) held the Basil Manly, Jr. Chair of Religious Education at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, where he taught for more than 40 years. Edge authored more than 80 published works. His influential books include: Teaching For Results, a standard text in seminaries for more than 40 years; Helping the Teacher; A Quest for Vitality in Religion; The Greening of the Church; and The Doctrine of the Laity. He is remembered for his passion for fostering an authentic faith and awakening the laity to their call to be the church.

Biography

Findley Bartow Edge was born September of 1916 in Albany, Georgia. This southern Georgia environment would assist in the development of one of the Southern Baptists' most influential writers and teachers. Findley B. Edge was born to John Andrew Edge and Daisy Findley Edge. Findley had one brother, Hoyt D. Edge, Sr. Findley Edge would graduate from Albany High School in 1933, at the height of the Great Depression. In his senior year, he was the recipient of the McIntosh Award at his school. He received a basketball scholarship to attend Stetson University in DeLand, Florida. At Stetson University Edge earned his first of many degrees, a Bachelor of Arts.

The life of Findley Edge has been divided into three sections. G. Temp Sparkman has written a paper on the life of Findley B. Edge, Findley B. Edge: Teacher, Theorist, Prophet (1986). Sparkman maintains that the career of Edge can be viewed through three distinct epochs. The first epoch covers the early influences of his seminary education in teaching and learning. The second epoch can be traced to the mid- to late-50s. It was here he produced a major work on authentic religion. The third epoch, according to Sparkman, began in the mid-60s with his interest in the renewal movement. It can be seen that the beginning of each of these epochs is traced to Edge's sabbatical leave from the seminary and the routine of everyday seminary life. The sabbatical leave was not magic in itself; rather it was an opportunity for Edge to pursue his passion or something that disturbed him. These epochs relate to his spiritual journey, the impact of the Word upon his heart, and his contact with a changing culture.

Findley Edge would begin a relationship with Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky, that would continue for more than 40 years. Edge would earn both the Master of Theology and Doctor of Theology degrees while a student at Southern Seminary. Edge stated that it would be during this era of his life as a seminary student that he would form his philosophy of Christian education under the influence of Dr. Gaines S. Dobbins, professor of religious education at Southern Seminary. It was under the influence of Dobbins's stimulating teaching that he became aware of the potential to help people grow through the process of education. It was during this seminal stage of his life that he began to raise the question concerning authenticity in religious life. In 1944, Edge completed his doctoral dissertation entitled Religious Education and the Problem of Institutionalism. Edge expressed a fear that Southern Baptists were showing evidence of growing institutionalism rather than growing authentic faith. He would describe authentic faith as a commitment of one's life to God through Christ in a continuing, growing relationship, and a faith that fulfills that to which God has called us. This passion would be put to sleep during the first epoch, but would be awakened in the late 50s.

Findley Edge was invited to join the faculty at Southern Seminary in 1947. He would eventually be named the Basil Manly, Jr. professor of Christian education. Gaines Dobbins would give Edge responsibility for teaching on the whole field of religious education. Edge identified his primary concern during this phase as striving for quality teaching in providing some simple and practical help for untrained teachers. It was during this first epoch of his career that Edge would write a significant paper on philosophical foundations of education entitled Studies in the Philosophy of Education (1955), which is archived at Southern Seminary.

During epoch one, Edge would also write two books on teaching that continue to be used in seminaries today: Teaching For Results (1956) and Helping the Teacher (1959). Edge's writings confirm that this phase of his life was consumed by teaching and learning.

Edge took his first sabbatical leave at Yale University and the Divinity School in 1954-55. He would earn a Master of Arts from Yale University. It was during this sabbatical leave at Yale that he would encounter Randolph Crump Miller. Edge developed a friendship and appreciation for Miller. He would identify Miller as being pivotal in teaching him that one's philosophy of Christian education ought to grow out of one's theology. The introduction of this new thought into such a turbulent time as the 1950s and 1960s would lead to Dr. Edge's second epoch. Edge declared in A Search for Authenticity (1983) that the racial crisis was beginning to cause serious social disruption. It disturbed him that churches, Southern Baptist churches in particular, were either reactionary or uninvolved. Southern Seminary invited Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as a lecturer, and churches withheld financial support as a protest. This event led Dr. Edge to understand better the family as primary teacher over the church. It was during this same time that he lost his excitement to search for a quality approach to teaching.

The problem of institutionalism was once again being raised in the heart and mind of Edge. The heart of the theologian would surface during this turbulent phase of his life. The influence of writing his dissertation and his introduction to Randolph Crump Miller would cause him to renew his search for authentic faith. While many of Edge's colleagues would search for answers to social issues within education, Edge would turn his search to theology. His search would lead him to write A Quest for Vitality in Religion (1963). This document would be one of his greatest achievements during this second epoch. Edge expressed his desire in this document to emphasize a sound theological base, a relationship with God that was experiential and personal (as distinguished from cognitive and mechanical), and a commitment to the Christian way that was authentic (as distinguished from superficial). Edge expressed that he felt God's basic call to man was a call to salvation. The church was not influencing culture; rather culture was impacting the church. Edge felt the real call of God to man was to be on mission for God. He felt that he had been so concerned with the event of salvation that he had not been faithful to God's call. Edge spent much time in his writings explaining that salvation is an event, but also results in a different walk. It seemed evident to Edge that the reaction of the local church to the challenges of the culture demonstrated failure in developing devoted followers of Christ.

Gordon Cosby of The Church of the Savior, Washington, D.C., had a significant influence upon Edge during this phase of his life. He would note that Cosby was doing what he was writing about. Edge would say about Gordon Cosby, that in terms of life and work of the church, he influenced his thinking more than any other person (Edge, 1983).

The latter epoch of Edge's life would be impacted by another sabbatical leave in 1964-65. Findley and Louvenia Edge would travel England, Scotland, Germany, Switzerland, France, and Italy. With the help of a grant from the Association of Theological Schools, he would visit Evangelical Academies. These academies were said to exist to bridge the gap between the church and society. Edge would seek to answer questions as to how the people of God, the laity, could be the key to bridge the gap between the church and the world.

Findley Edge would return from Europe continuing to look for answers. Edge's assessment of the European trip was that he did not find clear evidence that a bridge was being built between churches and the world. It was his opinion that some of the issues that existed there were not issues in the United States. The European churches were funded by the state, while the churches in the United States were not. The Academies were seldom in contact with the local congregations, but instead worked with businesses. Edge felt this difference was quite significant and opened to him a door of opportunity. Findley Edge would return from Europe energized to build that bridge in the United States. Edge returned home from Europe to find that his book, A Quest for Vitality (1963), had been a big success. Both vocational ministers and laypersons were expressing frustration with the life of the church. Edge's idea of the Vineyard Center was to offer a place of dialogue for interested vocational ministers and laypersons. This ministry would expand for the next several years, making it difficult to continue housing it on the campus of Southern Seminary. Edge would receive a grant from the Lilly Endowment, Inc. in 1972 that would facilitate relocation and further expansion of this ministry. Edge reported that things were going beautifully for The Vineyard Center until the energy crunch of the 1970s hit, and people stopped driving. Conferences were expensive and had to be cancelled because of great operating costs and low reserves. This led to the downfall of The Vineyard Center.

Edge authored another book during this same phase of his career, which he hoped would challenge the church-as-usual syndrome plaguing evangelicals. The Greening of the Church was published in 1971. In an effort to help people come alive at a deeper level in their spiritual experience, Edge offered five suggestions on what he would do if he were pastor of a church. These five suggestions are preaching, personal conversations, reading books, retreats and conferences, and lay witness weekends. This book would demonstrate Edge's desire to see the laity engaged in an on-mission lifestyle. He felt this was essential if the local church was to come alive and impact its culture.

In 1984, Findley Edge ended a career with Southern Baptist Theological Seminary that had begun in 1947. When talking with those who were students during the Edge years, it is common to hear how difficult it was to get in one of his classes. His classes would fill quickly because of his manner of engaging the students in and out of the classroom. When Edge joined the faculty of Southern Baptist Seminary there was no School of Religious Education. The seminary established one under the leadership of Gaines S. Dobbins in 1954. There would be only two professors, Dobbins and Edge. Southern Baptist Seminary honors the memory of Edge each year with the presentation of the Findley B. Edge and Louvenia Edge Faculty Award. This award is given to a professor for outstanding teaching.

In an article by Baptist Press (2002) on the life and death of Findley Edge, Wayne Ward, a colleague of Edge was interviewed. Ward said that Edge believed learning is not just getting the content out of the professor's head and into your head - or worse, out of his notebook and into your notebook - but learning is seeking the answer and searching. It was during this period of Edge's ministry, 1985, when he wrote The Doctrine of the Laity. Edge contended that Baptist laity would be the key to fulfilling the church's mission. Edge wrote, "A lay person cannot pay someone else to fulfill his or her ministry to God … God has called his people to ministry, and the ministry belongs to the laity whether they know it or not, and the ministry belongs to the laity whether they fulfill it or not" (1985, p. 46).

Edge and his wife, Louvenia, moved to Orlando, Florida, where he lived out his latter days. Findley and Louvenia were active members of College Park Baptist Church. Edge contributed to the speaking and writing circuit his passion for the church utilizing its greatest resource, its people. Findley B. Edge died in Orlando, Florida, on October 28, 2002, at the age of 86. Funeral services were held November 1 at the College Park Baptist Church, Orlando, Florida. Edge is survived by his wife, Louvenia, and sons Hoyt and Larry. Eddie Hammett, leadership consultant with the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, would write of Edge: "His works will follow him through many, many students he has touched and whose life he has transformed because he dared to go to a land he knew not of. I will miss him, but I will visit with him through his writings and through all the life-transforming memories" (2002, page not given).


Contributions to Christian Education

Findley B. Edge was offered an opportunity and a challenge. When he took his place on the faculty of Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, it was in the shadow of one of the giants, Gaines S. Dobbins. It is not uncommon to hear of the negative impact such an experience has had on someone, such as the case of Isaac in the shadow of his father, Abraham. We read of Absalom's struggle living in the shadow of his father, King David. We read of no such struggle between Dobbins and Edge. This speaks volumes about the character of both men. Edge was enabled to pursue his passion while being mentored by Dobbins. The essential relationship between mentor and the one being mentored is critical to the future of Christian education, and it is one of the missing links today. The relationship between Dobbins and Edge should encourage all Christian educators to be investing themselves in a colleague.

Findley Edge's book, Teaching for Results (1956), brought to the forefront a critical question in the field of teaching: "What is your goal?" This book continues to make its mark on Bible college and seminary campuses. It is unequaled in its simplicity in teaching the Sunday school teacher how to establish and achieve goals. "Purpose-driven" or "high expectation" churches are terms common for contemporary ministers. Findley Edge was a pioneer in this area long before they were common phrases. Books such as The Greening of the Church (1971) and The Doctrine of the Laity (1985) were attempts to get ministers to be more intentional in discovering and developing their church's richest resource - their membership. Edge lived during a time when too many ministers thought that only professionally trained and called ministers could accomplish the task. Edge would sow the seeds of purpose-driven and high expectation churches, and future generations would reap the rewards.

The churches of the Southern Baptist Convention began a campaign that all churches must become an On Mission Church. It is the belief of this denomination that no single church, institution, or agency can by itself reach a world with the gospel. Rather, God has equipped His churches to accomplish the purposes of His kingdom. It is the task of the leadership of these churches to help discover the gifts and talents within the congregations. Develop these persons God has gifted that congregation with to engage their particular gifts and talents in being on mission. This is not a thought single to Southern Baptists, but all evangelicals who see our world's needs expanding faster than we are able to respond. This lack of rapid response on the part of evangelicals has been in large part because we continue to hold to what is comfortable. The failure to reach more with the gospel message is primarily because we have not heeded the message sent long before by Findley B. Edge.

Edge's search for authentic faith led him to believe that the greatest untapped resource of the church was its people. Edge challenged the seminary community not to pass along just information from head to head, but to pass along a curiosity that would ask and search. The manner in which the seminarian had been impacted in the classroom-head to head-began to follow in congregations. Preaching and teaching within the congregation would imitate how we were trained. Edge's writings during the 1970s and 1980s demonstrated his ability to see what the churches would need to face challenges in the future. The contemporary movement among evangelicals that has resulted in a multitude of lay persons engaged in domestic and foreign missions, women's and men's conferences, and high expectation churches can thank Findley Edge.

Finally, Edge demonstrated a critical change of direction for Christian educators in his work A Quest for Vitality in Religion (1963). It was in this volume that Edge moved away from the contemporary emphasis upon methods in Christian education and returned to theology. Christian education must be seen first as Christian. Christian education must be incarnate in its teachings if it is to be transformational. However, the Christian educator's teachings must be inscripturated if they are to personify the Lord Jesus Christ. Some use the doctrine of the priesthood of the believer as an excuse for a Christian to make up his or her own mind about interpretation of Scripture or its teachings. Edge would encourage his generation to return to the Scriptures to find answers to the dilemmas of society. This would be a timely challenge during the free society of the 1960s. This same challenge needs to be offered today when so many are seeking answers within themselves. Rather than attempting to discredit the Bible and its ability to be relevant, let each of us, as Christian educators, take Edge's challenge to look for answers to man's dilemmas within the pages of Scripture.

Works Cited

  • Edge, F. B. (1944). Religious education and the problem of institutionalism. Unpublished Th. D. dissertation. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, KY.
  • Edge, F. B. (1948). An experiential philosophy of religious education. Faculty Inaugural Address, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Also published in Review and Expositor, 45 (1948), 407-422.
  • Edge, F. B. (1951). Does God want you as a minister of education? Nashville, TN: Broadman Press.
  • Edge, F. B. (1953). Teaching principles of religious education. Nashville, TN: Seminary Extension Department. Southern Baptist Convention.
  • Edge, F. B. (1956). Teaching for results. Nashville, TN: Broadman Press.
  • Edge, F. B. (1959). Helping the teacher. Nashville, TN: Broadman Press.
  • Edge, F. B. (1963). A quest for vitality in religion. Nashville, TN: Broadman Press.
  • Edge, F. B. (1971). The greening of the church. Waco, TX: Word Books.
  • Edge, F. B. (1971). Matthew 7:1-2. In C. A. Frazier (Ed.), What did the Bible mean? (pp. 11-14). Nashville, TN: Broadman Press.
  • Edge, F. B. (1974). Introduction. In W. Clemmons & H. Hester, Growth through groups (pp. 13-23). Nashville, TN: Broadman Press.
  • Edge, F. B. (1977). Discipling groups. In J. Hendrix & L. Householder (Eds.), The equipping of disciples (pp. 240-242). Nashville, TN: Broadman Press.
  • Edge, F. B. (1978). Into the world, so send I you. In R. D. Busy (Ed.), The new laity: Between church and world (pp. 53-74). Waco, TX: Word Books.
  • Edge, F. B. (1983). A search for authenticity. In M. Mayr (Ed.), Modern masters of religious education (pp. 33-64). Birmingham, AL: Religious Education Press.
  • Edge, F. B. (1985). The doctrine of the laity. Nashville, TN: Convention Press.
  • Hammett, E. (2002, November 8). The North Carolina Baptist News Journal, Biblical Recorder.
  • Sparkman, G. T. (1986). Findley B. Edge: Teacher, theorist, prophet. Louisville, KY: The Edge Festival Committee.
  • Newman, D. W. (1986). Findley Bartow Edge: A search for authenticity. Unpublished Ed.D. dissertation. The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, KY.

Bibliography

Books

  • (1956). Teaching for results. Nashville: Broadman Press.
  • (1956). Teaching for results.Korean. Songso kyosupop / Pindulli Eji cho ; No Yun-baek yok. Soul: Saengmyong ui Malssumsa.
  • (1959). Helping the teacher. Nashville: Broadman Press.
  • (1961). Helping the teacher / by Findley B. Edge; froanslated [sic] by Wayne Y. Siao. Kowloon, Hong Kong: Baptist Press.
  • (1961). Helping the teacher. Chinese. Zen yang jiao zhu ri xue / Aifenli zhu ; Xiao Weiyuan yi. Xianggang: Jin xin hui chu ban bu.
  • (1963). A quest for vitality in religion; A theological approach to religious education. Nashville: Broadman Press.
  • (1964). Teaching for results. Chinese. Translated by Grace Ho. Hong Kong: Baptist Press.
  • (1968?). A proposal for a Christian conference center. Louisville, Ky.?
  • (1970). A quest for vitality in religion: A theological approach to religious education. Chinese. Kowloon, Hong Kong: Baptist Press.
  • (1970). Helping the teacher. Spanish. Metodologia pedagogica / por Findley B. Edge ; version castellana Celia Mendoza y Sara P. Molina. Paso, TX: Casa Bautista de Publicaciones.
  • (1971). El Pueblo de Dios. Que es? Que hace? / Findley B. Edge ; version castellana por Alfonso Olmedo. El Paso, TX: Casa Bautista de Publicaciones.
  • (1971). The greening of the church. Waco, TX: Word Books.
  • (1972). Pedagogia fructifera / por Findley B. Edge ; version castellana Alberto Lopez C. Buenos Aires : Casa Bautista de Publicaciones.
  • (1972). Principles of teaching: Religious education 115. Nashville, TN: Seminary Extension Dept. of Southern Baptist Seminaries.
  • (1975). Teaching for results. Korean. Nashville: Broadman Press.
  • (1978). Into the world, so send I you. New laity. Waco, TX: Word Books, 53-74.
  • (1983). A search for authenticity. Modern masters of religious education. Birmingham, AL: Religious Education Pr.
  • (1985). The doctrine of the laity. Nashville: Convention Pr.
  • (1992). A reader in Christian education: Foundations and basic perspectives. Eugene S. Gibbs (Ed.). Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House.
  • (1994). A quest for vitality in religion:A theological approach to religious education. (Rev. Ed.). Macon, GA: Smyth & Helwys Pub.
  • (1995). Teaching for results. (Rev. Ed.). Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers.

Book Reviews about publications by Findley B. Edge

  • Blackwood, A W. (1957, Winter). Teaching for results. Encounter, 18, 94.
  • Miller, Randolph Crump. (1957, Summer). Teaching for results. Journal of Pastoral Care, 11, 123.
  • Swager, Robert G. (1963, Fall). Teaching for results. Iliff Review, 20, 46.
  • Trueblood, David Elton. (1963, Fall). A quest for vitality in religion: A theological approach to religious education. Review & Expositor, 60, 430-431.
  • Littell, Franklin H. (1964, April). A quest for vitality in religion: A theological approach to religious education. Foundations, 7, 195-196.
  • Miller, Keith. (1972, Summer). The greening of the church. Review & Expositor, 69, 369.
  • Johnson, William M. (1986, Spring). The doctrine of the laity. Review & Expositor, 83 (2), 332-333.
  • Buchanan, Edward A. (1995, Spring). Teaching for results. Faith and Mission, 12, 103-104.
  • Benson, Warren S. (1995, Fall). Teaching for results. Christian Education Journal, 16, 124-126.

Periodical Articles from The Kentucky Baptist State Newspaper

  • (1957, January 17). A theological basis for concern. p. 8.
  • (1957, March 21). A theological basis for concern. p. 3.
  • (1959, April 23). Do we need a Stewardship Commission? p. 7.
  • (1959, May 21). We do need a Stewardship Commission. Douglas M. Branch. p. 3.
  • (1959, May 28). Kentuckians dominate offices of auxiliary organizations. p. 3.
  • (1959, June 4). Southern Baptist Religious Education officers. p. 13.
  • (1960, June 2). Officers of the Southern Baptist Religious Education Association. p. 12.
  • (1960, June 16). Dr. Findley B. Edge. Picture. p. 5.
  • (1961, February 2). Gleanings from the field. p. 2.
  • (1962, November 22). Gleanings from the field. P. 2.
  • (1963, April 4). Daley observations: A helpful book. Chauncey R. Daley, Jr. p. 4.
  • (1963, August 1). Professor prescribes stimulants to growth. p. 4.
  • (1964, March 26). Gleanings from the field. p. 2.
  • (1964, May 7). Southern professors listed in Who's Who. p. 8.
  • (1966, April 28). Gleanings from the field. p. 2.
  • (1967, June 1). 'Tired of bull sessions,' Edge does something about church renewal. Picture. p. 11.
  • (1967, December 14). Radical change needed in modern church Edge says. Picture. p. 16.
  • (1969, April 3). Gleanings from the field. p. 2.
  • (1969, May 29). Reflections on the Christian Life Commission Conference. John Dunaway. p. 13.
  • (1969, July 10). Kentuckian in Brazil. Picture. p. 7.
  • (1969, July 24). Daley observations: Churches look to yourselves not to the denomination. Chauncey R. Daley, Jr. p. 4.
  • (1970, July 25). Superficiality causing declines. Picture. p. 16.
  • (1970, November 7). Suburbs need new preaching, evangelism patterns. Picture. p. 10.
  • (1971, January 16). Ministering downtown: Wanted, a new plan for a new day. J. Wesley Shipp p. 3.
  • (1971, January 16). National Bible conference features Kentuckians. p. 9.
  • (1971, March 27). Bible is hope for contemporary man, speaker say. p. 8.
  • (1972, January 1). Ky. authors honored. p. 11.
  • (1972, April 29). Daley observations: A meaningful contribution to church renewal. Chauncey R. Daley, Jr. p. 4.
  • (1972, July 22). Edge opens church renewal center. Picture. p. 6.
  • (1972, December 2). Renewal evangelism effort set. p. 6.
  • (1972, December 30). Clemons heads confab center. Picture. p. 16.
  • (1973, September 15). First 'renewal evangelism' conference set. p. 15.
  • (1973, December 22). 1974 Kentucky Baptist state evangelism conference. Pictures. p. 11.
  • (1974, January 19). Annual evangelistic confab nears, Severns Valley is host. Picture. p. 16.
  • (1974, February 2). Seminary prof calls for renewal. Larry High. p. 16.
  • (1974, October 19). Conference to center on evangelism in church program. p. 8.
  • (1980, June 11). SBC activity includes roles by Kentuckians at St Louis this week. Cox, James H. p. 7.
  • (1984, July 24). Edge and Edgeisms: Still practically the same. Cox, James H. p. 5.
  • (1985, December 24). Seminary announces festival honoring Findley Edge. p. 3.
  • (1986, February 4). Edge to lead conference on doctrine of laity. p. 5.
  • (1990, February 20). Southern Seminary. p. 8.
  • (2002, November 5). Findley Edge, pioneer Christian educator/author, dies at age 86. p. 14.

Articles from Other Southern Baptist Periodicals

  • (1951, January). After evangelism - what. Review & Expositor, 48, 67-80.
  • (1952, January). Introduction to child study. Review & Expositor, 49, 98-99.
  • (1952, April). Educational psychology of learning. Review & Expositor, 49, 235.
  • (1952, July). Your child and God. Review & Expositor, 49, 366-367.
  • (1952, October). The church in community action. Review & Expositor, 49, 479-480.
  • (1956, April). Christian nurture and conversion. Review & Expositor, 53, 187-199.
  • (1957, March-April). Church-home cooperation. Religious Education, 52(2), 110-118.
  • (1958, January). Theological foundations of religious education. Review & Expositor, 55, 70-77.
  • (1961, January - February). Shall the layman teach religion? Religious Education, 56, 54-60.
  • (1961, April). Church education for tomorrow. Review & Expositor, 58, 247-248.
  • (1961, July). New life in the church. Review & Expositor, 58, 391-392.
  • (1961, July). Nurture and evangelism of children. Review & Expositor, 58, 392-393.
  • (1962). Families in the church: A protestant survey. Review & Expositor, 59, 537-539.
  • (1963, Winter). Priesthood of believers. Review & Expositor, 60, 9-21.
  • (1963, Spring). The rebirth of the laity. Review & Expositor, 60, 252-253.
  • (1963, Spring). Time lapse for receiving new members: Yes!. Review & Expositor, 60, 172-178.
  • (1963, Fall). An introduction to Barth's dogmatics for preachers. Review & Expositor, 60, 465-466.
  • (1963, Fall). Christian education As engagement. Review & Expositor, 60, 477-478.
  • (1963, Fall). Confirmation: History, doctrine, and practice. Review & Expositor, 60, 452-453.
  • (1964, Winter). Call to commitment: The story of the Church of the Saviour, Washington, DC. Review & Expositor, 61, 601-603.
  • (1964, Winter). Second chance for American protestants. Review & Expositor, 61, 589-590.
  • (1964, Spring). Parents as teachers. Review & Expositor, 61, 26-44.
  • (1964, Fall). Reshaping the Christian life. Review & Expositor, 61, 354-355.
  • (1965, Winter). Everything Is yours. Review & Expositor, 62, 124-125.
  • (1965, March). Biographical sketch. Extension News, 14, p. 3.
  • (1966, Summer). The fourth man. Review & Expositor, 63, 357-358.
  • (1967, Spring). Renewal movements in contemporary Protestantism. Review & Expositor, 64, 181-194.
  • (1967, April). Edge's pursuit of "Vitality" evolves into workshop. Tie, 32, 3.
  • (1967, May). Getting out of the church building and into the world. Church Administration, 9, 16.
  • (1969, Winter). A second touch. Review & Expositor, 66, 97-98.
  • (1969, Winter). Christian in the market place. Review & Expositor, 66, 98-99.
  • (1969, Winter). Salt and light. Review & Expositor, 66, 98.
  • (1969, Spring). A theology for Christian Education. Review & Expositor, 66, 234-235.
  • (1969, Spring). Journey inward, journey outward. Review & Expositor, 66, 232-233.
  • (1969, June). Faculty reports full calendar of spring dates. Tie. 38. 4.
  • (1969, July). Where are we in fulfilling the mission of the churches? Home Missions, 40, 17.
  • (1969, October). Thrusts toward renewal: The church. Home Missions, 40, 10.
  • (1969, October). We are not getting the results we desire. Sunday School Builder, 50, 50.
  • (1969, December). Renewal's cutting edge. Tie. 38, 8.
  • (1970, Spring). The secular congregation. Review & Expositor, 67, 251-252.
  • (1970, Summer). The affable enemy. Review & Expositor, 67, 386-387.
  • (1970, Summer). The creative role of interpersonal groups in the church today. Review & Expositor, 67, 387-388.
  • (1971, Summer). For God's sake, be human. Review & Expositor, 68, 427.
  • (1971, Summer). The future of the Christian. Review & Expositor, 68, 420.
  • (1971, Fall). Children and conversion. Review & Expositor, 68, 563-564.
  • (1971, Fall). Does the church know how to teach: An ecumenical inquiry. Review & Expositor, 68, 561-562.
  • (1971, Fall). Language and concepts in Christian Education. Review & Expositor, 68, 557-558.
  • (1971, Fall). The language gap and God: Religious language and Christian Education. Review & Expositor, 68, 557.
  • (1971, Fall). The new man for our time. Review & Expositor, 68, 563.
  • (1971, December). Rediscovering the church's mission … an interview with Findley Edge. Church Administration, 14, 2.
  • (1972). The change agent. Christian Century 89 (Jl) 5-12, 751.
  • (1972, Winter). Sharing groups in the church: An invitation to involvement. Review & Expositor, 69, 115-116.
  • (1972, Fall). The validity of the Christian mission. Review & Expositor, 69, 544.
  • (1973, Summer). Come to the party. Review & Expositor, 70, 417.
  • (1972, January - February). Education is something particular – but is it enough. Religious Education, 67, 33-37.
  • (1972, March). The church can be renewed. The Baptist Program, 6.
  • (1974, Winter). Devotional life in group settings. Review& Expositor, 71, 345-351.
  • (1974, Winter). The becomers. Review & Expositor, 71, 129-130.
  • (1974, Spring). The fire we can light. Review & Expositor, 71, 272-273.
  • (1974, Fall). Tomorrow: A new church. Review & Expositor, 71, 568.
  • (1974, July). The devotional life in group settings. Review & Expositor, 71, 345.
  • (1976, Spring). Flow of religious instruction. Review & Expositor, 73, 244-245.
  • (1976, Spring). Game free. Review & Expositor, 73, 244.
  • (1976, Spring). Theology of Christian education. Review & Expositor, 73, 243-244.
  • (1976, Winter). Breath of the mystic. Review & Expositor, 73, 89.
  • (1976, Winter). Community of the spirit. Review & Expositor, 73, 109-110.
  • (1976, Winter). Experiential education: X-Ed. Review & Expositor, 73, 110.
  • (1976, Winter). How persons grow in Christian community. Review & Expositor, 73, 110-111.
  • (1976, Winter). Second coming of the church. Review & Expositor, 73, 111-112.
  • (1976, Winter). Seduction of the spirit. Review & Expositor, 73, 112-113.
  • (1976, Winter). Target-group evangelism. Review & Expositor, 73, 106.
  • (1977). Spindles and spires. Christian Century, 94 (N 9), 1039-1040.
  • (1977, January). Faculty lead several organizations. The Tie, 46, 2.
  • (1977, October). Hall joins staff, Cromer leads group. The Tie, 46, 3.
  • (1978, Spring). [Review of the book The religious education we need by Lee, James Michael]. Perspectives in Religious Studies, 5, 61.
  • (1978, Summer). Gaines S Dobbins: The teacher. Review & Expositor, 75, 971-382.
  • (1978, July). Gains S. Dobbins - The teacher. Review & Expositor, 75, 371.
  • (1978, September). Pro File: Findley Edge. The Tie, 47, 7.
  • (1979). The evangelical concern for social justice. Religious Education, 74 (S-O), 481-489.
  • (1979, December). Teaching persons not lessons. Outreach, 10, 32.
  • (1980, January). Let's practice our theology. The Quarterly Review, 40, 4.
  • (1980, April). Southern seminary offers off-campus credit courses. The Tie, 49, 5.
  • (1980, June). President Duke McCall, faculty, alumni participate in BWA. The Tie, 49, 5.
  • (1980, September). Fall conferences, lecture series promote personal ministry growth. The Tie, 49, 2.
  • (1980, October). Meeting to focus on the local church. Report from the Capital, 5, 3.
  • (1981, January). CTEC: Studies in Philippians. The Tie, 50, 6.
  • (1981, October). Faculty-staff news. The Tie, 50, 2.
  • (1981, December). The state of the laity an interview on the church and the laity with author-educator Findley Edge. Bangham, Bill. World Mission Journal, 52, 4.
  • (1982, April). Individual development: A dynamic of the church. Search, 12, 26.
  • (1982, May). Spring Conference. The Outlook, 31, 7.
  • (1982, June). Community recognizes years of services. The Tie, 51, 12.
  • (1982, July). Teaching ministers: Despite change southern keeps its Edge. The Tie, 51, 6.
  • (1982, November). Developing peacemaking groups in local churches. The Tie, 51, 8.
  • (1983, Fall). Faith and mission: God's call to the laity. Faith and Mission, 1, 15-27.
  • (1983, January). Faculty and staff news. The Tie, 52, 10.
  • (1984, July). Religious educators honor Findley Edge. The Tie, 39, 10.
  • (1986, Summer). The human church in the presence of Christ. Review & Expositor, 83 (3), 500-501.
  • (1986, Fall). Invitation to holiness. Review & Expositor, 83 (4), 666-667.
  • (1986, Winter). Seven days a week: Faith in action. Review & Expositor, 83 (1), 151-152.
  • (1987, Winter). Belonging: Our need for community in church and family. Review & Expositor, 84 (1), 150-151.
  • (1987, Winter). Ministry of the laity. Review & Expositor, 84 (1), 151-152.

Audiovisual Media

  • (196-?). Classroom lecture: God's basic call. (Tape reels 1105). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (196-?). Renewal Conference. (Tape reels 1118 – 1119). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1960, October 27-28). Chapel address: What it means to be a Christian / Findley B. Edge. (Tape reels 550 - 551). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1965). Religious education and the problem of institutionalism. microform. THESES Th.D. .Ed35r. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1965, September 22). Chapel address. (Tape reel 433). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1966, October 27). Chapel address. (Tape reel 626). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1966, November 29 – December 1). Renewal Conference Address. Findley Edge, Gordon Cosby. (Tape reels 757 – 758). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1967, April 20). Address recorded at State Missions Directors' Conference, Toccoa, GA. (Tape reels 907 – 908). Toccoa, GA.
  • (1967, November 28-30). Conference: 1. Is our kind of church adequate for our kind of world? / Findley B. Edge; Toward renewal in the church / Kenneth L. Chafin. 2. Pietist-secular controversy in the church / Robert Raines; Secular evangelism / Robert Raines. 3. Secular covenant / Robert Raines; Secular prayer / Robert Raines. (Tape reels 894 – 896). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1968). Renewal in the church: A plan for missions. Cassette Recording No. CA 1314- 1316. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1968). Retooling for the 70's in religious education. (Tape reel 1168). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1968, March 22-23). Conference contents: 1. Ministry of laity. 2. Practical plan for mission; Personal spiritual renewal for small groups. 3. Discussion; Evaluation. (Tape reels 936 – 938). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1969, January 8). Chapel Address. (Tape reel 1133). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (197-?). Faith at Work conference. Cassette Recording No. CA 114 - 126. Pocono Mt., PA.
  • (197-?). Renewal conference. Cassette Recording No. CA 1366 - 1367. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1970). My impressions of the need for church renewal. (Tape reel 1333). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1970, May 12-13). Renewal Conference. (Tape reel 1267). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1972). Jesus and human value [sound recording] / Frank Stagg, Findley Edge. (Tape reels 2221 - 2223). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1972, Nov. 9-11). Vineyard Conference. (Tape reels 2199 - 2201). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1973). Vineyard Conference: Restructuring the education in church. (Tape reel 1889). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1973 Mar. 6-7). Chaplain's Conference: Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. (Tape reel 1707). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1973). Vineyard Conference: Faith at work. (Tape reels 2194 – 2196). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1973, October 12). Chapel address: Missions emphasis week. (Tape reel 1648). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1974, September 6). Chapel address: Summer missions program. (Tape reel 1726). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1974, October 18). Chapel address: Celebration of diversity. (Tape reel 1730). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Spiritual Life Committee.
  • (1974, November 7, 13). Vineyard Conference Address. Martin Marty, Findley Edge, Frank Stagg. Cassette Recording No. CA695 - 698. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1976). Renaissance of faith. 1. A biblical approach. 2. A time of hope. 3-4. A relational approach. 5. A practical approach. Cassette Recording No. CA 918 - 922. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1976, April 2-3). Vineyard Conference Address. Findley Edge, Amy Harris. Cassette Recording No. CA892 - 895. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1977, September 7). Chapel address. (Tape reel 5065). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • Combs, K. Stephen. (1978). The course of religious education at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1902-1953: a historical study. Cassette Recording No. CA 8933-8941. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1978, September 20). Chapel address. Cassette Recording No. CA1972. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1978, October 24). Classroom lecture. Gheens lectures. Cassette Recording No. CA 1983. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1979). Current developments in the field of religious education. Cassette Recording No. CA 2307. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (198-?). What is the church's responsibility for the development of the individual believer? Cassette Recording No. CA 5344. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1980) Alumni Luncheon. Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Alumni Association. (Tape reel 118). St. Louis: SBC Annual Meeting.
  • (1980). Studies in Philippians. Cassette Recording No. CA 3566 – 3569. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1980, May 6). Chapel address. Cassette Recording No. CA3115. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1980, September 16). Chapel address. (Tape reel 1997). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1980, September 12). Chapel address: Spiritual regeneration. Missions emphasis week. Cassette Recording No. CA3368. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1981). Religious education. (Tape reel 2206). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1984). Interview with Findley B. Edge: The ministry of the laity [video recording] / by Mike Harton. VT 415 [U-MATIC]. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1985, June 18-July 3). Classroom lecture: Renewal in the church / Findley Edge. (Tape reels 120 - 122). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1986). Interview with Findley Edge [video recording] / interviewed by Julie M. Seckman. Interview conducted during The Edge Festival, "an event to honor the thought, contributions, and ministry of Findley Edge," jointly sponsored by Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and the Eastern Baptist Religious Education Association. VT 3360 [VHS]. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1986). Reflections. Address delivered to participants in The Edge Festival, "an event to honor the thought, contributions, and ministry of Findley Edge," jointly sponsored by Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and the Eastern Baptist Religious Education Association. VT 3361 [VHS]. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1986, June 24). Chapel address: We need to clean up our language in church. (Tape reel 3747). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1986, July 1-2). Classroom lecture: Renewal in the church. 5 videocassettes: VT 376-380 [U-MATIC]. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1988). Findley Edge's reflections on Martin Luther King's visit to Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, April 19, 1961. Cassette Recording No. CA 253. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1990, February 6). Chapel address: Gaines S. Dobbins: a forward-looking innovator. Founders' Day address. VT 2161 [VHS]. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1990, February 6). A forward looking innovator, Gaines S. Dobbins / [Findley B. Edge]. Address delivered on Founders' Day at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Ky. Manuscript: 378.992 .So88xfod 1989- 1990 Pt.2B. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1990, February 6). A forward looking innovator, Gaines S. Dobbins / [Findley B. Edge]. This was revised and delivered as Founders' Day address at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Ky., Feb. 6, 1990. Manuscript: 378.992 .So88xfod 1989- 1990 Pt.2A. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1992). Alumni homecoming festival (1992 June 6-7: Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Ky.) Panel discussion, 1992, June 6 [sound recording] / H. Barnette, H. McElrath, F. Edge. VT 435 – 436 [VHS]. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1992). Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. President's Associates banquet, 1992, June 6. Cassette Recording No. CA 303 – 304. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1993). Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Presidents. Faculty tribute to Roy L. Honeycutt, Jr. VT 477 [VHS]. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1998). Interview with Findley Edge [sound recording] / C.J. Turner. Recorded in his Orlando home. Cassette Recording No. CA 13501. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

Other Materials

  • (1944). Religious education and the problem of institutionalism. THESES Th.D. Ed35r. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1947-1987). General files, correspondence, lecture and seminar notes, course materials, sabbatic notes, notes of pastoral care, workbooks in church efficiency, Sunday school leadership training materials, papers concerning parachurch organizations, miscellaneous papers. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (196-?). Studies in philosophy of education. S.l. : s.n., 42 leaves ; 30 cm. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1961). Does God want you as a minister of education? 18 slides: col. + 1 manual (11 p.). Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1961). Religious education in its theological orientation: Seminar papers. Manuscript. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary
  • (1961). Theological foundations of religious education. ii, 91 leaves ; 29 cm. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1972). Renewal in the church. 1 v. (various pages).
  • (1977, July). Parents: Especially for you. Manuscript: 7 leaves, bound; 29 cm. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1977, July). Parents as teachers. Manuscript: 26 leaves, bound; 29 cm. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1977, July). Manuscript: Church-home cooperation. 7 leaves, bound; 29 cm. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • (1990). Miscellaneous papers related to the Founders' Day address, 1990: A forward looking innovator, Gaines S. Dobbins: / by Findley B. Edge. 20 items; 31 cm. 378.992 .So88xfod 1989- 1990 Pt.2B SUPPL. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.
  • Note: Many of the above materials are available at The Southern Baptist Seminary in Louisville, KY.

Excerpts from Publications

(1956). Teaching for results. Nashville: Broadman Press.

"It is our belief that one of the reasons we have not been able to achieve desired results is that our aims, and therefore our teaching, have not been sufficiently specific. Teachers have been guided by aims that were general and often vague. As a result, members have not seen the relevance to their own experience of what was taught. Thus, the Sunday school class has tended to become a place where high Christian ideals are discussed. Too often this study ends only in discussion without sufficient carry-over into daily life in the home, school, business, recreational activities, social activities, and other areas of experience." (viii)

"The primary problem, then, that the teacher faces is not so much how to teach the Bible as it is how to lead individuals - children and adults alike - in those experiences through which they will come to know Jesus as Savior and through which they will increasingly grow in his likeness. In short, the task of the teacher is to discover and use the most effective means for securing behavior response that is in harmony with the ideals of Jesus." (27)

"The Bible is the central textbook for teaching religion. The problems and experiences of people can be adequately analyzed and properly directed only in terms of and within the sphere of the Bible. Only within its pages do we come to understand fully the glory and majesty of God and the nature and destiny of man. Unfortunately, Sunday school teachers sometimes use the Bible in such poor and ineffective ways that its impact on the lives of the class members has not been nearly what it ought to be." (116)

"One of the major problems confronting us in providing adequate religious instruction is the limited time available. Merely to point out that the church has the child only for a brief time on one week-day is to indicate the problem. In this brief time teachers are supposed to give the individual the religious instruction that will enable him to develop Christian character. The task is too important and too complex to be achieved so simply and so briefly. This is not to minimize the place and importance of Sunday school, nor to say that it cannot or has not made significant contributions to the spiritual development of multitudes of people. The Sunday school simply cannot and should not be expected to carry out the task of religious education alone." (178-179)

(1971). The greening of the church. Waco, TX: Word Books.

"The church must also have some organized form. If what it is now doing seems to be inadequate, then how should the church be organized to equip people best for ministry? It must be stated clearly that there is no "one way" by which this change can occur. There are numerous ways in which God is working to bring about change. Likewise, there is no "one program" a church ought to follow. Each church must find its own "shape" or organized life in the light of a number of factors. Variety and flexibility are the order of the day. However, a multitude of concerned pastors and laymen who are ready to change cry out for help and possible guidelines." (10-11)

"There are those who have rejected the institutional church. They say the church cannot be saved. They say the modern church is so bound by tradition, so filled with vested interests, and has so many reactionary members, and such poor leadership that it cannot be used of God to work in today's world. I reject this position. I believe the church can be renewed. Not only do I believe the church can be saved; I believe the church must be saved!" (14)

"Let those be warned who, in their haste to find some practical suggestions, turn first to this section to try to find a "practical program" and omit a careful consideration of the theological and personal bases which precede. This would be a tragic mistake, for renewal in its essence is the gift of God. It is the work of the Holy Spirit. It is a meeting with God at a deeper level of one's life. No practical program can substitute for this "happening" in the individual's life. It is here renewal must begin. To approach it in any other way is to seek to create it through institutional or promotional technique." (135)

(1994). A quest for vitality in religion: A theological approach to religious education. (Rev. Ed.). Macon, GA.: Smyth & Helwys Pub.

"At the present time churches are experiencing a period of almost unparalled popularity and prosperity. Such a situation normally would be the basis for unrestrained optimism and rejoicing. Strangely, such is not the case. Many thoughtful religious leaders and mature Christian laypersons evidence a growing ferment of uneasiness and concern. In spite of plush church buildings, growing membership, and many vigorous activities that are carried on within the churches, something is seriously wrong with modern Christianity. Something is wrong at its center. It is in danger of losing its life and dynamic." (xiii)

"To give both the incarnate and the verbal witness, the church must be involved in a vigorous and persistent program of outreach for those who are unreached. At this point those who have kept this emphasis on outreach central in their ministry deserve a genuine work of commendation. This does not mean that all has been done that should be have been done or could have been done. It does mean that outreach for those who are unreached has been a matter of deep concern, and a serious effort has been made to match the need with action. Yet an overwhelming task still remains." (108-109)

"The second major innovation that will be necessary in the life of the church if we are to approach the ideal of a regenerate church member involves the practice of Christian discipline. The pattern of church life that has the best possibility of leading to an experimental faith begins to emerge more clearly now. It has been stated previously that in a saving encounter the individual must respond to God in terms of the mission for which God calls that person as a Christian. It has also been stated that growth toward and into this mission is not optional. In addition, in the strict sense, it is not possible for one to have a saved soul and a lost life. The person is a unity, and when one is saved, that one is saved in the totality of his or her being. When these factors are kept in focus, it is clear that disciples must submit themselves to the discipline of the Christian life as a necessary part of the total salvation experience. This is not salvation by works. What is done for the individual is done by God alone. But this emphasis does say something exceedingly important about the quality of the saving relationship. This is an emphasis that the modern church has not kept in focus." (175)

(1969, December). Renewal's cutting edge. Tie. 38, 8.

"His popular series of three or four Church Renewal Conferences each year, held on the seminary campus since 1964, have attracted some of the top pastors and laymen to hear outstanding renewal leaders such as Gordon Cosby, Robert Raines, Keith Miller, George Webber, and Claxton Monro."

(1970, July 25). Superficiality causing declines. Picture. Western Recorder. 16.

Edge comparing social activity with renewal stated: "In addition to ministering to the physical, economic and social needs of people, our desire is so to relate to these people that they will come to have a personal relationship with God through Jesus Christ. This renewal is deeper and more personal relationship with God Himself and with other people. In its essence, renewal is an attempt to discover how to bring new life or 'the real life' into the church".

(1974, February 2). Seminary prof calls for renewal. Larry High. Western Recorder. 16.

"What we need is for a real spiritual resurgence in the lives of all of God's people. We need to come to find a sense of personal relationship with God in which there is an exactness in our lives about who God is and what God is doing. This is what needs to happen to us."

(1978, September). Pro File: Findley Edge. The Tie, 47, p. 7. Basil Manly, Jr., Professor of Theological Education

Born: Sept. 6, 1916, Albany, GA.

Converted: Age 12, First Church, Albany GA.

Schools: Public schools in Albany, GA, Stetson University, Yale, Southern Seminary, Union Seminary, Columbia University.

Favorite school subject: English

Favorite Biblical book: Gospel of John

Favorite Scripture verse: Matthew 7:20

Favorite subject to teach: Church Renewal

Joined faculty: 1947

Married: June 3, 1939, to Louvenia Littleton

Favorite music: Popular music of the 30's and 40's

Favorite color: Blue

Hobbies: Golf, fishing

Favorite vacation spot: Florida beach

(1983, Fall). Faith and mission: God's call to the laity. Faith and Mission, 15.

"the emphasis in our churches has been primarily on exhortation rather than on explanation. The emphasis has been on exercising faith rather than on understanding faith. In the preaching and teaching in our churches we have exhorted people to 'have faith,' 'to trust,' 'to believe' as though everyone understood quite clearly what it meant 'to have faith,' 'to trust,' and 'to believe.' It is this assumption that I would like to challenge. Although our emphasis upon the necessity of 'having faith' has been strong and quite sincere, it is my conclusion that our understanding of what the New Testament means by 'having faith' has tended to be much too superficial and therefore tragically limited."


Recommended Readings

(1956). Teaching for results. Nashville: Broadman Press.

How does a teacher of the Bible improve themselves? Edge answers this question through a systematic approach to teaching. This book provides the tools that teachers need to get the results of Bible knowledge or in Christian living they desire in their students. Edge focuses on three heading: knowledge, inspiration, and conduct response. Many practical illustrations and examples of the principles are shared. This book is present as a resource guide to help the individual teacher, training union leader, minister of education, or pastor improve the biblical teaching within their church.

(1959). Helping the teacher. Nashville: Broadman Press.

This book was translated into many different languages and used as a tool to train Sunday school teachers around the world. Edge guides the reader to focus the Sunday school lesson on a single topic instead of transforming the world in one lesson. His concern was that lessons were "too general and often vague".

(1963). A quest for vitality in religion; A theological approach to religious education. Nashville: Broadman Press.

This book presents the argument that institutionalism is taking over the church. During this time period, churches were growing with large congregations and new buildings. This book attempts to draw attention back to the religion of the New Testament rather than the modern day social religion. Edge guides the reader through a process to return to the theology of the Bible rather than the theology of the "new American religion."

(1971). The greening of the church. Waco, TX: Word Books.

This book is about renewal and hope for the church from the personal view of an academic professional. Dr. Edge creates a 1970's renewal perspective from three major convictions: (1) the basic problem in today's church is personal and spiritual; (2) we must recapture a balance between evangelism and social involvement; and (3) dealing with positive, practical proposals. This book is a practical proposal of how to view our church and recommended action steps to create renewal in the church.

(1984, July 24). Edge and Edgeisms: Still practically the same. Cox, James H. Western Recorder. 5.

A recap of Edge's career and his steadfast approach to training ministers and lay people for more than 40 years.

(2002, November 5). Findley Edge, pioneer Christian educator/author, dies at age 86. Western Recorder. 14.

A review of his life's work.

(1988). Findley Edge's reflections on Martin Luther King's visit to Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, April 19, 1961. Cassette Recording No. CA 253. Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

During a transitional time in America, Edge reflects on his view of the Martin Luther King Jr.'s visit to Southern Seminary and the impact this had.

(1990, February 6). Chapel address: Gaines S. Dobbins: a forward-looking innovator. Founders' Day address. VT 2161 [VHS]. . Louisville, KY: The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

A great video of Edge honoring Gaines S. Dobbins.


Author Information

Steve Yates

Steve Yates is a Ph. D. student in the School of Leadership and Church Ministry at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, KY. He also serves as Director of Administrative Support for the campus managing accounts payables, central receiving, and purchasing

Larry Purcell

Larry Purcell, Ed.D., serves as Associate Professor of Leadership and Church Ministry at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky.

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