Protestant Educators

Picture of Kenneth O. Gangel

Dr. Kenneth O. Gangel (1935 - ): A prolific author and an experienced leader has been influential in the field of Christian education for over forty years. He's written numerous articles and over 50 books, while pastoring, teaching, raising a family and leading schools. His impact reaches around the world through students, co-authored books, and working with leaders of churches and schools. A radio ministry and his own writing also serve to help lay people draw near to God and serve Him in their families and churches. In all he's accomplished his passion for the integration of truth marks all of this work, as he lives out his philosophy of education, which is informed by his theological convictions.

Biography

Christian educators know Kenneth O. Gangel best for his numerous articles and books (more than 50) on their multifaceted field. He influenced Christian education from his numerous leadership positions in Christian higher education as well. Although his speaking ministry reaches throughout the United States and around the world, as a child Kenn never envisioned that God would enable him to impact the field of Christian education in so many ways.

Kenneth O. Gangel, a first generation American, was born June 14, 1935 in the slums of Patterson, New Jersey. His father, Otto John Gangel, immigrated from Vienna, Austria and his mother, Rose Marie Schneider from Switzerland. He characterizes his family as "semi-religious but not church-going." During his formative years, Kenn witnessed a real battle between light and darkness. His mother, though she could barely read English, taught him theology that withstood the test of time and scrutiny. "The Holy Spirit through Scripture developed in her mind a full blown theology," as Kenn recalled. She then shared her wisdom with her beloved son. Conversely, his father harbored a hatred for Christianity and silently followed Hitler.

As a street kid, Kenn fought his way to and from school. Growing up, he knew that his mother prayed for him devoutly. In contrast, his father abused his mother. At the age of ten his parents divorced. His father abandoned him. These events had a tremendous impact on Kenn's childhood. His mother, unable to care for him and work to support them, sent him away to boarding school. Kenn attended Stony Brook boarding school in Long Island for two years. He hated the experience and became very lonely. The only person who loved him had to send him away, he recalled. A highlight of these early years included meeting his mentor, Frank Gaebelein. At about this same time, Gangel began to display a budding love for music, which would permeate his life. The regimented school provided a great academic experience, but his inner tumult prevented him from delighting in the experience.

During his freshman year of high school, his mother found a job cooking at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. She left Kenn behind with an aunt and her three boys. However, his mother accepted the job with the agreement that her son could attend the Wheaton Academy. During his sophomore year, Kenn moved to Wheaton. He quickly discovered three great interests in high school: basketball, music and girls. "I devoted my life to all three," he stated. Though a believer, Kenn's gaze did not focus on Christ. By being the first in his family to graduate from high school, he achieved all he ever expected to accomplish.

Upon graduation, Kenn went to the Air Force looking for an opportunity to serve. However, the Air Force did not welcome a 150 pound 17 year old into their ranks or even offer him an application form! He quickly learned that both God and his mother envisioned other plans for his life. She desperately wanted him to attend college and upon her initiative he applied to Taylor University in Indiana. The administrator took a look at his deplorable grades and required him to take the GED exam before being considered for admission. Kenn then made a deal with his mother. If he passed the test, he agreed to attend college for a year. If he failed, she would agree to stop talking about him going to college. The prayers of a righteous mother prevailed! Kenn "miraculously" passed the GED exam and enrolled in Taylor University.

Kenn recalls the greatest year of his life as his freshman year of college. "The gym was bigger, there was more music and best of all, there were more girls! Why did I fight this?" he wondered. All of this fun earned him a double probation (academic and behavioral) and "the Dead End Kid" as his coach's nickname. A member of a tenor quartet in college, Kenn took the opportunity to tour Germany during the summer of 1954 and minister to the people over there with his group. He went to sing but refused to preach or give his testimony. During his time in Germany, God changed his life through active ministry. He became a Christian at camp at the age of six, but during the summer of 1954 he made a new commitment to God.

In the fall of 1954, Kenn returned to college a very different young man. His grades changed dramatically. Early that fall, God's call into ministry developed an inner compulsion to do something in Christian service, but he did not know what. He continued his prolific dating life, while he worked nights at a factory and attended classes during the days. Then, in December of 1954 he met Betty, and life for Kenn would never be the same.

Betty, a farm girl from Ohio, entered Taylor the fall of 1954 and had her own prolific dating life. A friend dared Kenn to date a freshman girl, so he asked Betty to a basketball game. He has never dated anyone since. They married two years later in 1956. Kenn and Betty, partners for life, have two children, Jeffrey and Julie along with four grandchildren.

Kenn graduated from Taylor University in 1957 with a double major in business and biblical studies. He then went to the only seminary he knew, Grace Theological Seminary, where he earned a Masters Degree in Divinity. During his time in seminary Gangel pastored a church full-time. He found that much of what he studied at Grace did not transfer to the church. So he was encouraged to attend a Winona Lake Pastor's Conference where he learned about Christian education from Howard Hendricks. He then enrolled in a Master of Arts in Christian Education. Although the Winona Lake School of Theology hosted the program, Fuller Seminary staffed and operated it. In 1960, he completed two theses in one year; graduated from two seminaries at one time and now wondered what God had in store for him. As he pondered and prayed over all of the possibilities, Kenn grew certain that nothing academic lay ahead for him. He could not have been more mistaken. Kenn writes,

"In 1960 I began teaching at Calvary Bible College as Chairman of the Christian Education Department. I had the M.Div. from Grace and an M.A. from Fuller in CE. I agreed to head CE for a year and then become the chairman of the Bible Department the second year. I enrolled in Concordia Seminary and began an S.T.M. (at the time I had no idea what those letters would mean in the late 20th century) with a major in homiletics and a minor in Greek.
Within three years, I became registrar and one year later the Academic Dean told me he was leaving the next year and recommending me for his replacement. I asked the folks at Concordia if I could write a thesis and cap my S.T.M. and was granted permission, hence the foundational research for Leadership for Church Education published by Moody in 1969 and still in print as Team Leadership in Christian Ministry (with three revisions). I immediately entered UMKC with a major in College Administration and a minor in Organizational Communications, graduating in 1969 with a 4.0 average. (A far cry from his undergraduate record!) (The parenthetical comment reflects the thoughts of the authors not Kenneth O. Gangel). In 1975, UMKC called me back to commencement to receive the alumni achievement award."

Kenn broadened the scope of his ministry as the administrative assistant for Academic Affairs for Kansas City Regional Council for Higher Education (1968-69). In 1970 he became the founding director of the School of Christian Education at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School where he served as professor for four years. He then moved to Miami Christian College where he served as president (1974-1979) and professor (1979-82). He held a variety of positions during his time at Dallas Theological Seminary; including, department chairman and distinguished professor of Christian education (1982-1992); Vice-President for Academic Affairs and Academic Dean (1992-1997). Most recently, Gangel was the Executive Director at Toccoa Falls College Graduate Studies Division in Toccoa Falls, GA (1997-2000) and is currently a scholar in residence there (2000-present) (Anthony & Benson, 2003, p. 373).

Kenn enjoyed every job he held; though some proved more trying than others. As noted above, he held a variety of positions in academia, and has also been heavily involved in the church. He's performed roles such as pastor and director of Christian education. He's written widely on topics from integration of faith and learning to church leadership and more recently on the much-needed topic of fathering. Throughout his ministry Kenn held firmly to his belief that theology and the Bible are the foundations of Christian education. Following Gaebelein, Kenn believed in the necessity of integration in true Christian education. "If there is no integration of faith and learning then there is no Christian education", Gangel commented.

For those being trained for the future of Christian education Kenn offers a word of advice, "The field of Christian education is changing. Many places value the training of specialist over the training of generalist. So, students should think and pray about what their future ministry might look like and tailor their education to that area of specialization."

Works Cited

All information taken from personal interviews with Kenn Gangel and from Gangel, K. (1997). Kenn Gangel: A personal testimony . Dallas, TX: Dallas Theological Seminary.

  • Anthony, M. (Ed.). (2001). Evangelical dictionary of Christian education . Grand Rapids, MI: Baker.
  • Anthony, M., & Benson, W. (2003). Exploring the history and philosophy of Christian education: Principles for the 21st century . Grand Rapids: Kregel.
  • Baron, S. (1981). A survey of the educational philosophies of Gangel, Getz, LeBar, and Richards . Unpublished doctoral dissertation, Dallas Theological Seminary.
  • Burgess, H. (2001). Models of religious education . Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
  • Couchman, M.R.H. (1994). A critical analysis of Kenneth O. Gangel's philosophy of Christian Education . Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of South Florida.
  • Gangel, K. (1997). Kenn Gangel: A personal testimony . Dallas, TX: Dallas Theological Seminary.
  • Lee, J. (2000). Forging a better religious education in the third millennium . Birmingham, AL: Religious Education Press.
  • Lockerbie, D. B. (1994). A passion for learning: The history of Christian thought on education . Chicago: Moody Press.

Contributions to Christian Education

As a true champion of Christian education, the Lord gave Kenneth O. Gangel a wonderful and unusual mix of gifts and life experiences. His ministry and writing as a theologian, philosopher, educator, leader, parent, pastor, and administrator (he even has musical recordings) make his contributions quite unique. Writing and leading have distinguished his career. His publications (numerous articles and more than 50 books) cover a wide range of issues. His leadership of five schools left lasting marks in Christian higher education. D. Bruce Lockerbie comments,

"Gangel has developed a practical philosophy of Christian education for elementary and secondary schools, undergraduate colleges, and graduate seminaries; his work also extends to churches and families. His great distinctive is the clarity with which he articulates and illustrates his ideas, making him a most effective communicator in the many conferences and conventions at which he speaks" (Lockerbie, 1994, p. 395).

Kenneth O. Gangel follows a long line of prestigious theologian/philosopher/educators who have championed a truly Christian perspective on education and life. Justin Martyr, Augustine, and Frank Gaebelein among others in that line held to an integrated field of truth. They resisted the bifurcation of truth into sacred and secular categories and recognized truth from both natural and special revelation. After all, how could something be true and not find its source in the God who is truth? Gaebelein's theological proposition, "All truth is God's Truth" captured Kenn's imagination and anchored his epistemology for Christian education.

While virtually every Bible College or Christian liberal arts college advertises an integrated approach to education, most graduates still come away confused about how their courses related to each other or to a Christian worldview. The specialization that characterizes almost every facet of the American way of life has affected even Christian educational processes. Because of his life long concern for Christian higher education, Kenn calls for schools to do more than advertise an integrated education. While Kenn believes that curriculum can and should reflect integrated planning, true integration begins with each professor.

"Gangel offers six suggestions on how integration of faith and learning can be carried out: First, the teacher must constantly be about the all-important task of theological sieve building… . Second, the teacher must also be at least an amateur theologian. Third, teachers must help students 'get it all together' in a Christian world view… . Fourth, the teacher will stop confusing the integration of truth with classroom devotions… . Fifth, Christian teachers must learn to walk a carefully balanced line between openmindeness (sic) and unchangeable doctrine… . Finally, the teacher should approach the task of integration with reverence and relaxation" (Couchman, 1994, pp. 168-171).

The faculty must understand: 1) how a Biblical understanding of God influences their discipline, 2) how their subject depends on and informs other subjects and 3) how a correct understanding of their area influences a Christian perspective on life. If each faculty member would communicate that kind of interconnectedness, students could come away from their education with a better understanding of how their world fits together from a Christian point of view.

Because of his emphasis on integration, Kenn became well known in the Christian primary and secondary school movement through speaking at numerous Association of Christian School International (ACSI) events. Again, his insistence on integration of faith and learning finds its way into his concern that "… every teacher must at least be an amateur theologian" (Couchman, 1994, p. 124). Teachers must discuss their subjects within a theological context. Children and young people deserve to know how the information they learn flows from the God they love. While this approach welcomes truth wherever it may be found, it rejects eclecticism. Instead, Kenn proposes to push information through a theological sieve created from a careful and informed study of the scripture (Chart taken from class notes in Teaching in Christian Higher Education , Dallas Theological Seminary, 1990). Therefore, every teacher must be a theologian.

Philosophers of education rarely implement their philosophies successfully (Kenn's mentor Frank Gaebelein at Stony Brook school would be a glaring exception. Perhaps Gaebelein's example created Kenn's restlessness until he could demonstrate his philosophy in a leadership position). Christian schools often pick their leaders for their public presence and fund raising skills. Few ask them to articulate or implement a theologically sophisticated philosophy of Christian education. Fewer still screen candidates for training in higher education administration. Kenn possessed training and gifts in all these areas. Kenn's time at Calvary Bible College and Trinity Evangelical Divinity School prepared him for his dream job. He wanted to be president of a Bible college and Miami Christian College offered Kenn that opportunity. Under his administration, the school flourished and the faculty worked on integration. In fact, Miami Christian College required every faculty member to have a minimum of fifteen hours of biblical and theological training. If the faculty member was deficient in this when hired, they were given a three year limit to complete the requirement. His legacy in this area continues. As of this writing, students at Dallas who have chosen the Academic Track must read Toward a harmony of faith and learning and write a major paper on "Integration".

"During the 1970s, Gangel rose to prominence as an articulate and theologically consistent shaper of the evangelical perspective" (Burgess, 2001, p. 155). Kenn brought his considerable skills in teaching and administration to bear on two prominent seminaries. He served Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (1970-1974) as professor and founding director of the School of Christian Education. He used his training in higher education administration to enable Trinity to successfully negotiate their first accreditation application with the Association of Theological Schools. Later, as Chairman of the Christian Education Department at Dallas Theological Seminary (1982-1992), his innovations found expression in the M.A. and D.Min. in Christian Education, a collaborative Ph.D. with the University of North Texas, and a collaborative M.A. in Biblical Exegesis and Linguistics with the Wycliffe Bible Translators.

Many professionals in Christian education trace their roots back to Gangel's work in these schools. From this perspective, names like Benson, Lawson, Sell, Kane, and Clark emerge. However, unlike anyone else in the field, Gangel has the uncanny ability to pick people up and carry them along to the next level in their professional development. One brief turn through co-authorships in his bibliography surfaces names like Dennis Williams (Denver Seminary and Southeastern Baptist Seminary); Sam Canine (Dallas Theological Seminary); Jim Wilhoit (Wheaton College); and Warren Benson (Trinity Evangelical Divinity School). In addition, his many edited volumes gave beginning professionals a place to have their voices heard. Kenn used his power in the publishing industry to advance the careers of many professionals. Their names fill his books (Check the bibliography of all the edited volumes, particularly the Christian educator handbook series).

Often, those who write about leadership let others do the leading. Few write and lead at the same time or only lead groups of their own making. Kenn has written prolifically on leadership while giving significant leadership to multiple institutions. Those who have worked with him testify that he lives what he writes. He leads well from within an institution as he did in the various roles of Registrar, Department Chair, Academic Dean, or Vice President. He also leads well from the top as president of Miami Christian College. Over a period of four decades, he held top administrative leadership positions in Christian higher education. Each school continues to benefit from those contributions and his development of quality administration and leadership.

While leading these different schools, he published a steady stream of books and articles on leadership. Of course, the obvious problem with leading and writing at the same time becomes a challenge to consistency. To this writer's knowledge (encompassing seventeen years of working for and with Kenn), no challenge of inconsistency between philosophy and administration ever arose without being quickly reconciled. His books, Coaching ministry teams: Leadership and management in Christian organizations along with Feeding and leading capture the essence of his participatory and highly relational style. Some practical examples of this forward thinking include bringing students into the administrative processes of Miami Christian College, aligning student council offices with executive officers at Dallas Theological Seminary, and his refusal to micro manage what had been entrusted to those who served with him.

Countless students have grown up under Kenn's direct and indirect teaching. His direct teaching ministry as a professor spreads out over Calvary Bible College, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Miami Christian College, Dallas Theological Seminary and (currently) Scholar in Residence at Toccoa Falls Christian College. Lectureships in forty different institutions of higher learning across North America, Europe, Asia, and Africa have personally spread his insights into Christian education. His experience and training encouraged those who bear the day to day struggle of administering a Christian school under a growing assortment of stresses and challenges.

Those indirectly taught by him will have read one or more of over fifty books published thus far. Benson and Anthony sum his accomplishments up very well when they say,

"Few evangelical Christian educators of the latter twentieth century can compare with the contributions made in the field by Gangel… . In addition to works in the fields of Christian education, Gangel has also written numerous Bible commentaries. His commitment to biblical theology and his ability to integrate solid theological foundation with his Christian education materials sets him apart from his peers" (Anthony & Benson, 2003, p. 373)

Other indicators of Gangel's contributions to Christian education come from looking at how often authors cite his works or checking the topics assigned to him in The Evangelical Dictionary of Christian Education . They include, "Bible Teaching", "Bible Translations", "Christianity", "Contract Learning", "Howard Hendricks", "Inerrancy of Scripture", "Integration of theology and educational philosophy", "Judaism", "Leadership", "Midlife Crisis", and "Stages of Life/Adulthood" (Anthony, 2001). With all of these responsibilities, one wonders why Anthony failed to give Gangel an entry in the dictionary.

One special accolade comes to Kenn from James Michael Lee. One rarely receives honor from someone with whom they disagree. Yet, when Lee sought evangelical voices to contribute to his volume, Forging a better religious education in the third millennium, he selects Kenn Gangel to be one of the two voices who will speak for evangelicals (Lee, 2000). Lee states that Gangel is "… possibly the most widely known and most respected Evangelical Protestant religious educationist of his era… " (Anthony, 2001, p. 5). Indeed, Gangel's chapter is worth the price of the book as Kenn synthesizes an evangelical position and distinguishes Christian education from merely religious education.

Of all the subjects Kenn has addressed in his writings, perhaps the closest to his heart is the family. Molded by a godly mother and suffering from an absent father, Kenn returned again and again to address the Christian home. The dates of books, tapes, videos and articles span his entire career. As husband and father, he compensated for an initially negative and then absent role model by excelling in his own marriage and family. The fact that his two children both serve in Christian ministry does not astound anyone. However, the fact that he has co-authored books with his daughter, his wife, and most recently his son provides a unique window into Kenn's leadership in his home. Kenn and Jeff's new Fathering like the Father: Becoming the dad God wants you to be allows the reader to step inside the relationship between Jeff and Kenn. Unlike other volumes, this book about a father son relationship builds on their actual relationship while disclosing some of the pain Kenn experienced without a father.

Even a casual look at Kenn's bibliography will reveal that Kenn consistently addressed the contemporary issues of the day. Unlike other authors, he does not appear to get caught up in them. Throughout the mega-church and church growth movements, he has remained a steadfast supporter of the small church. His concern for the church has taken him personally into over one thousand churches to preach and teach. Twice, his concern translated into pastoral roles in small churches. His first pastorate came in the late 1950's and his second came in the early 1980's. One of his first concerns at Toccoa Falls involved the development of the Master of Ministry program for the small church pastor.

Kenn has not neglected individuals who may not have been touched by his vast ministry in schools, conferences, churches, and international travel. For over twenty years, Kenn Gangel has been the voice of Morning Light, a daily devotional that airs on over 100 radio stations. The sheer discipline required to write and deliver that many messages along with other massive responsibilities sets Kenn apart from his peers.

Fortunately for those who follow, Kenneth O. Gangel provides a treasure chest of thinking about Christian education. Already, his writings are being examined by a new generation of scholars who probe his theology and philosophy (Baron, 1981). Through his writing, Kenn has helped define the field of Christian education in this generation. Through his leadership, he has shaped schools of Christian higher education. As a professor, husband, administrator, or father, Kenn Gangel provided a living example of his writings. His life brings us back to one of his central passions, integration. For Kenn, integration of faith and learning always begins with the life of the teacher. Kenneth O. Gangel lives out his own premise.

Works Cited

  • Anthony, M. (Ed.) (2001). Evangelical dictionary of Christian education . Grand Rapids, MI: Baker.
  • Anthony, M., & Benson, W. ( 2003). History and philosophy of Christian education: Principles for the 21st century . Grand Rapids: Kregel.
  • Baron, S. A. (1981). A survey of the educational philosophies of Gangel, Getz, LeBar, and Richards . Unpublished Th.M. thesis, Dallas Theological Seminary.
  • Burgess, H. (2001). Models of religious education . Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
  • Couchman, M. R. H. (1994). A critical analysis of Kenneth O. Gangel's philosophy of Christian Education: A study of adult higher education . Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, University of South Florida.
  • Lee, J. (2000). Forging a better religious education in the third millennium . Birmingham, AL: Religious Education Press.
  • Lockerbie, D. B. (1994). A passion for learning: The history of Christian thought on education . Chicago: Moody Press.

Bibliography

Books

  • Gangel, K. (1964). Enriching your teaching of the E.T.T.A. course Sunday school evangelism: A guide of practical helps for teaching teachers and leaders in the church educational program (2nd ed.). Wheaton, IL: Evangelical Teacher Training Association.
  • Gangel, K. (1968). Enriching your teaching of the E.T.T.A course understanding teaching: A guide of practical helps for those teaching the course to teachers and leaders in the church educational program. Wheaton, IL: Evangelical Teacher Training Association.
  • Gangel, K. (1968). Understanding teaching. Wheaton, IL: Evangelical Teacher Training Association.
  • Gangel, K. (1968). Understanding teaching: A guide of practical helps for those teaching the course to teachers and leaders in the church educational program. Wheaton, IL: Evangelical Teacher Training Association.
  • Gangel, K. (1969). A study of the evolution of college accreditation criteria in the north central association and its effect on bible colleges. Unpublished doctoral dissertation.
  • Gangel, K. (1970). Leadership for church education. Chicago, IL: Moody Press.
  • Gangel, K. (1970). Should college students evaluate their teachers? Wheaton, IL: Accrediting Association of Bible Colleges.
  • Gangel, K. (1970). Walter L. Wilson: The beloved physician. Chicago, IL: Moody Press.
  • Gangel, K. (1972). The family first. Minneapolis, MN: His International Service.
  • Gangel, K., &Robertson, F. (1972). The trinity and man. Wheaton, IL: Scripture Press.
  • Gangel, K. (1973). So you want to be a leader!: An analysis of basic principles and methods of Christian leadership. Harrisburg, PA: Christian Publications.
  • Gangel, K. (1974). 24 Ways to improve your teaching. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
  • Gangel, K., &Gangel, E. (1974). Between Christian parent and child. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House.
  • Gangel, K. (1974). Competent to lead. Chicago, IL: Moody Press.
  • Gangel, K., &Gangel, E. (1974). Leader's guide for group study of 24 ways to improve your teaching. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
  • Gangel, K. (1975). The effective Sunday school superintendent: A handbook for leaders. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
  • Gangel, K. (1975). You and your spiritual gifts. Chicago, IL: Moody Press.
  • Gangel, K. (1978). The gospel and the gay. Nashville, TN: T. Nelson.
  • Gangel, K. (1979). The family first. Winona Lake, IN: BMH Books.
  • Gangel, K. (1979). Understanding teaching. Wheaton, IL: Evangelical Teacher Training Association.
  • Gangel, K. (1980). Lessons in leadership from the Bible. Winona Lake, IN: BMH Books.
  • Gangel, K. (1981). Building leaders for church education. Chicago, IL: Moody Press.
  • Gangel, K. (1981). So you want to be a leader! Leader's guide. Harrisburg, PA: Christian Publications.
  • Gangel, K. (1981). You can be an effective Sunday school superintendent. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
  • Gangel, K. (1982). Church leadership and administration: A syllabus: (A guide to the recorded lecture series). Grand Rapids, MI: Institute of Theological Studies, Outreach, Inc.
  • Gangel, K., &Benson, W. (1983). Christian education: Its history and philosophy. Chicago, IL: Moody Press.
  • Gangel, K. (1983). Thus spake Qoheleth: A study guide based on an exposition of Ecclesiastes. Camp Hill, PA: Christian Publications.
  • Gangel, K. (1983). Toward a harmony of faith and learning: Essays on bible college curriculum. Farmington Hills, MI: William Tyndale College Press.
  • Gangel, K. (1983). Unwrap your spiritual gifts. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
  • Gangel, K. (1985). The church education handbook. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
  • Gangel, K., &Zhu, W. (1985). Fu yin yu kuai huo ren: cong sheng jing zhen li kan tong xing lian xing wei. Xianggang: Tian dao shu lou.
  • Gangel, K. (1987). 1 &2 Timothy and Titus. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
  • Gangel, K. (1987). Acts. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
  • Gangel, K., &Gangel, E. (1987). Building a Christian family. Chicago, IL: Moody Press.
  • Gangel, K., &Hendricks, H. (Eds.). (1988). The Christian educator's handbook on teaching. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
  • Gangel, K. (1988). Matthew 1-14. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
  • Gangel, K. (1988). Matthew 15-28. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
  • House, H., Smith, D., &Gangel, K. (1988). Schooling choices. Portland, OR: Multnomah.
  • Gangel, K. (1989). Feeding &leading. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
  • Gangel, K. (1989). Romans 1-12. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
  • Gangel, K. (1989). Romans 13-16 and Galatians. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
  • Gangel, K. (1989). So you want to be a leader: Basic principles and methods of Christian leadership. Camp Hill, PA: Christian Publications.
  • Gangel, K., &Canine, S. (1992). Communication and conflict management in churches and Christian organizations. Nashville, TN: Broadman Press.
  • Gangel, K. (1992). Growing in grace and godliness: A study of I Timothy, II Timothy, Titus. Denver, CO: Accent Publications.
  • Gangel, K., &Gangel, B. (1992). Learning to be the church: A study of Acts. Denver, CO: Accent Publications.
  • Gangel, K., &Wilhoit, J. (Eds.). (1993). The Christian educator's handbook on adult education. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
  • Gangel, K., &Gangel, E. (1993). Defending Christian liberty: A study of Galatians. Colorado Springs, CO: Accent Publications.
  • Gangel, K. (1993). Rejoicing in faith and freedom: A study of Romans. Denver, CO: Accent Publications.
  • Williams, D., &Gangel, K. (1993). Volunteers for today's church: How to recruit and retain workers. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.
  • Gangel, K., &Wilhoit, J. (Eds.). (1994). The Christian educator's handbook on spiritual formation. Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.
  • Gangel, K., &Gangel, E. (1994). Encountering the king: A study of Matthew. Denver, CO: Accent Publications.
  • Gangel, K., &Gangel, E. (1994). Knowing the heart of God: A study of John. Colorado Springs, CO: Accent Publications.
  • Gangel, K., &Gangel, E. (1994). Loving the world through Jesus: A study of I, II, III John and Jude. Colorado Springs, CO: Accent Publications.
  • Gangel, K., (1995). Called to teach: A biblical challenge to renounce intellectual idolatry and dedicate ourselves to spiritual discipleship on Christian school campuses. Colorado Springs, CO: Association of Christian Schools International.
  • Gangel, K., &Gangel, E. (1995). Living in the light of promise: A study of I and II, Thessalonians. Colorado Springs, CO: Accent Publications.
  • Gangel, K., &Gangel, E. (1995). Sharpening our eyes of faith: A study of I and II Peter. Colorado Springs, CO: Accent Publications.
  • Gangel, K., &Gangel, E. (1995). Your family: Biblical solutions for raising children. Gresham, OR: Vision House Publishing.
  • Gangel, K., &Wilhoit, J. (Eds.). (1996). The Christian educator's Handbook on family life education. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.
  • Gangel, K., &Hendricks, H. (Eds.). (1996). The Christian educator's handbook on teaching. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.
  • Gangel, K., &Wilhoit, J. (Eds.). (1997). The Christian educator's handbook on adult education. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.
  • Gangel, K., &Wilhoit, J. (Eds.). (1997). The Christian educator's handbook on spiritual formation. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.
  • Gangel, K. (1997). Team leadership in Christian ministry: Using multiple gifts to build a unified vision. Chicago, IL: Moody Press.
  • Gangel, K. (1998). Acts. Nashville, TN: Broadman &Holman.
  • Gangel, K., & Pallova, H. (1998). Povolání: ucitel: dvanáct zamy_lení nad textem z Bible urcen_ch tem, které buh povolal k vyucování. Praha: Biblická práce pro deti: Mezinárodní asociace krestansk_ch ucitelu.
  • Gangel, K. (1999). Ministering to today's adults. Nashville, TN: Word Publisher.
  • Gangel, K., &Wilhoit, J. (Eds.). (2000). The Christian educator's handbook on family life education. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.
  • Gangel, K. (2000). Coaching ministry teams: Leadership and management in Christian organizations. Nashville, TN: Word Publisher.
  • Gangel, K. (2000). Feeding &leading. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.
  • Gangel, K., &Anders, M. (2000). John. Nashville, TN: Holman Reference.
  • Gangel, K. (2002). Daniel. Nashville, TN: Broadman &Holman.
  • Gangel, K., &Bramer, S. (2002). Genesis. Nashville, TN: Broadman &Holman.
  • Gangel, K., &Gangel, J. (2003). Fathering like the Father: Becoming the dad God wants you to be. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.

Chapters in Books

  • Gangel, K. (1975). August Hermann Francke. In E. Towns (Ed.), History of religious educators (pp.190-199). Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House.
  • Gangel, K. (1979). The Biblical basis of youth work. In R. Zuck (Ed.), Youth education in the church (pp. 27-43). Chicago, IL: Moody Press. 1979.
  • Gangel, K. (1979). Vocational counseling. In R. Zuck (Ed.), Youth education in the church. Chicago, IL: Moody Press.
  • Gangel, K. (1994). Learning to lead like the Lord. In C. Dyer (Ed.), Integrity of heart, skillfulness of hands (pp. 263-268). Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House.
  • Gangel, K. (1995). Evangelical theology and religious education. In R. Miller (Ed.), Theologies of religious education (pp.59-82). Birmingham, AL: Religious Education Press.
  • Gangel, K. (1996). Nurturing grandparents in the church. In J. Wilhoit (Ed.), Christian educator's handbook on family life education (pp. 225-241). Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Book House.
  • Gangel, K. (2000). Candles in the darkness. In J. Lee (Ed.), Forging a better religious education in the third millennium (pp.113-133) Birmingham, AL: Religious Education Press.

Videos

  • Kienel, P., Narramore, C., &Gangel, K. (1979). Christian school parent ministry. Whittier, CA: Association of Christian Schools International.
  • Loth, P., McKenna, D., &Gangel, K. (1983). Dynamic bible teaching. Wheaton, IL: Evangelical Teacher Training Association.
  • Gangel, K., &Gangel, E. (1987). Building a Christian family a guide for parents. Dallas, TX: Dallas Seminary Video Ministry.
  • McKenna, D., Cannell, L., &Gangel, K. (1988). Dynamic Bible Teaching. Wheaton, IL: Evangelical Teacher Training Association.
  • Edwards, C., &Gangel, K. (1994). Creative teaching techniques for all teachers an inspirational, information-packed seminar. Lynchburg, VA: Sunday School Dynamics.
  • Gangel, K., Lawson, M. &Lawson, T. (1994). Raising children. Dallas, TX: Dallas Theological Seminary.
  • Gangel, K. (1996). Delivering theological education that works. Dallas, TX: Dallas Theological Seminary.

Articles

  • Gangel, K. (1966). John Dewey: An evangelical evaluation. Bibliotheca Sacra, 123, 325-333.
  • Gangel, K. (1967). John Dewey: An evangelical evaluation. Bibliotheca Sacra, 124, 22-29.
  • Gangel, K. (1968). According to the scriptures. Bibliotheca Sacra, 125, 123-128.
  • Gangel, K. (1970). Paul's Areopagus speech. Bibliotheca Sacra, 127, 308-312.
  • Gangel, K. (1971). The Amish of Jamesport, Missouri. Practical Anthropology, 18, 156-166.
  • Gangel, K. (1973). Emerging patterns in church education. Christianity Today, 17, 4-7.
  • Gangel, K. (1973). Significant books of 1972: Education and renewal. Christianity Today, 17, 33.
  • Gangel, K. (1974). Significant books of 1973: Congregational life and ministry. Christianity Today 18, 14-16.
  • Gangel, K. (1977). Arnold Toynbee: An evangelical evaluation. Bibliotheca Sacra, 134, 144-155.
  • Gangel, K. (1977). Arnold Toynbee: The man and his message. Bibliotheca Sacra, 134, 52-58.
  • Gangel, K. (1977). Toward a biblical theology of marriage and family: pt 1: Pentateuch and Historical books; pt 2: Poetical and prophetic books. Journal of Psychology &Theology, 5, 150-162.
  • Gangel, K. (1977). Toward a biblical theology of marriage and family: pt 1: Pentateuch and Historical books; pt 2: Poetical and prophetic books. Journal of Psychology &Theology, 5, 55-69.
  • Gangel, K. (1977). Toward a biblical theology of marriage and family, pt 3: Gospels and Acts. Journal of Psychology &Theology, 5, 247-259.
  • Gangel, K. (1977). Toward a biblical theology of marriage and family, pt 4: Epistles and Revelation. Journal of Psychology &Theology, 5, 318-331.
  • Gangel, K. (1978). Christian higher education and contemporary culture: Isolation or penetration. Bibliotheca Sacra, 135, 291-302.
  • Gangel, K. (1978). Developing a philosophy of teaching: Conditioning or indoctrination. Bibliotheca Sacra, 135, 195-205.
  • Gangel, K. (1978). Foundations for the Christian college: From Harvard to HEW. Bibliotheca Sacra, 135, 3-15.
  • Gangel, K. (1978). Integrating faith and learning: Principles and process. Bibliotheca Sacra, 135, 99-108.
  • Gangel, K. (1980). The Bible college: past, present, and future. Christianity Today, 24 (7), 34-36.
  • Gangel, K. (1980). Christian education confronts contemporary morality. Journal of Christian Education, 1 (1), 17-20.
  • Gangel, K. (1980). Moral entropy, creation, and the battle for the mind. Bibliotheca Sacra, 137, 156-169.
  • Gangel, K. (1982). A living liturgy for contemporary Christians: An exposition of Romans 11:33-12:2. Journal of Christian Education, 3 (1), 5-9.
  • Gangel, K. (1983). Biblical feminism and church leadership. Bibliotheca Sacra, 140, 55-63.
  • Gangel, K. (1984). Passing the torch. Religious Education, 79, 43-46.
  • Gangel, K. (1984). The place of the small church in today's world. Bibliotheca Sacra, 141, 55-67.
  • Gangel, K. (1985). Daniel 7: A vision of future world history. Grace Theological Journal, 6 (2), 247-256.
  • Gangel, K. (1985). Reexamining biblical worship. Bibliotheca Sacra, 142, 164-178.
  • Gangel, K. (1986). Who controls Christian schools? Christian Education Journal, 7 (1), 5-13.
  • Gangel, K. (1987). Leadership: Coping with cultural corruption. Bibliotheca Sacra, 144, 450-460.
  • Gangel, K. (1987). Thinking like a Christian: An evangelical analysis of rationality. Christian Education Journal, 8 (1), 61-72.
  • Gangel, K. (1988). Lessons from the kidnapped. Religious Education, 83, 518-525.
  • Gangel, K. (1989). Developing new leaders for the global task. Evangelical Missions Quarterly, 25 (2), 166-171.
  • Gangel, K. (1989). Ten forces shaping Christian education. Bibliotheca Sacra, 146, 320-329.
  • Gangel, K. (1991). Biblical theology of leadership. Christian Education Journal, 12, 13-31.
  • Gangel, K. (1991). Ten steps to Sunday school revival. Christian Education Journal, 11, 31-42.
  • Gangel, K. (1992). Evangelical education for the 21st century. Bibliotheca Sacra, 149, 471-479.
  • Gangel, K. (1993). Made in America: The shaping of modern American Evangelicalism. Bibliotheca Sacra, 150, 110-111.
  • Gangel, K., & Rooker, M. (1993). Response to Oosterhuis: Discipline versus punishment. Journal of Psychology & Theology, 21, 134-137.
  • Gangel, K., &Sullivan, C. (1994). Mind over management: The role of critical thinking in educational administration. Christian Education Journal, 15, 64-74.
  • Gangel, K. (1996). Biblical integration: The process of thinking like a Christian. Evangelical Review of Theology, 20, 209-219.
  • Gangel, K. (1996). Nurturing grandparents in the church. Journal of Psychology &Theology, 24, 247-254.
  • Gangel, K. (2001). Marks of a healthy church. Bibliotheca Sacra, 158, 467-477.
  • Gangel, K. (2004). Candles in the darkness. Christian Education Journal, 1, 159-176.
  • Gangel, K. (2005). "Education for Renovation": An executive summary of Dr. Dallas Willard's presentations at the 2004 NAPCE conference. Christian Education Journal, 2, 154-161.

Reviews by Gangel

  • Gangel, K. (1971). [Review of the book Research on religious development: A comprehensive handbook]. Christianity Today, 16, 25-28.
  • Gangel, K. (1973). [Review of the book You and Your Children]. Journal of Psychology &Theology, 1 (4), 81.
  • Gangel, K. (1976). [Review of the book Invitation to Religious Education]. Christianity Today, 20, p 32-33.
  • Gangel, K. (1984). [Review of the book Megatrends: Ten new directions transforming our lives]. Christian Education Journal, 5 (1), 72-73.
  • Gangel, K. (1985). [Review of the book Your gift of administration]. Bibliotheca Sacra 142, 90.
  • Gangel, K. (1986). [Review of the book The Christian, the arts, and truth: Regaining the vision of greatness]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 143, 377.
  • Gangel, K. (1986). [Review of the book The Christian college: A history of Protestant higher education in America]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 143, 90.
  • Gangel, K. (1986). [Review of the book The Christian education of adults]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 143,188-189.
  • Gangel, K. (1986). [Review of the book Home style teaching]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 143, 188.
  • Gangel, K. (1986). [Review of the book Multiple staff handbook]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 143, 281.
  • Gangel, K. (1986). [Review of the book Parents' rights]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 143, 377.
  • Gangel, K. (1987). [Review of the book Christian education and the search for meaning]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 144, 475-476.
  • Gangel, K. (1987). [Review of the book Christian excellence: Alternative to success]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 144, 358-359.
  • Gangel, K. (1987). [Review of the book Getting along with each other]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 144, 359.
  • Gangel, K. (1987). [Review of the book Liberating the laity: Equipping all the saints for ministry]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 144, 240.
  • Gangel, K. (1988). [Review of the book Celebrating our faith: Evangelism through worship]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 145, 236.
  • Gangel, K. (1988). [Review of the book Evangelicalism: The coming generation]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 145, 472-473.
  • Gangel, K. (1988). [Review of the book Getting things done]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 145, 118.
  • Gangel, K. (1988). [Review of the book Marriage for good: The lost art of staying happily married]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 145, 235-236.
  • Gangel, K. (1988). [Review of the book Strength in servant leadership]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 145, 120.
  • Gangel, K. (1988). [Review of the book Teaching to change lives]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 145, 237.
  • Gangel, K. (1988). [Review of the book Where faith seeks understanding: Planning for adult education in the church]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 145, 476.
  • Gangel, K. (1989). [Review of the book Effective Bible teaching]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 146, 236.
  • Gangel, K. (1989). [Review of the book Keeping them out of the hands of Satan: Evangelical schooling in America]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 146, 359-360.
  • Gangel, K. (1989). [Review of the book Making higher education Christian: The history and mission of Evangelical colleges in America]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 146, 117.
  • Gangel, K. (1989). [Review of the book Making a leadership change]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 146, 474.
  • Gangel, K. (1990). [Review of the book Leadership in Christian ministry]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 147, 381.
  • Gangel, K. (1990). [Review of the book Revisioning the DRE]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 147, 505.
  • Gangel, K. (1991). [Review of the book Dying for change: An arresting look at the newrealities confronting churches and para-church ministries]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 148, 379.
  • Gangel, K. (1991). [Review of the book Effective church leadership: Building on the 12 keys]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 148, 382-383.
  • Gangel, K. (1991). [Review of the book The frog in the kettle]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 148, 378-379.
  • Gangel, K. (1991). [Review of the book Leadership in religious education]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 148, 253-254.
  • Gangel, K. (1991). [Review of the book Leading with a follower's heart]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 148, 381-382.
  • Gangel, K. (1991). [Review of the book Managing to be the best]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 148, 383.
  • Gangel, K. (1991). [Review of the book Solving church education's 10 toughest problems]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 148, 505-506.
  • Gangel, K. (1991). [Review of the book What every Christian should know]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 148, 254-255.
  • Gangel, K. (1992). [Review of the book A curriculum design manual for theological education: A learning outcomes focus]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 149, 382-383.
  • Gangel, K. (1992). [Review of the book Mastering church management]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 149, 125-126.
  • Gangel, K. (1992). [Review of the book Mastering worship]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 149, 125.
  • Gangel, K. (1993). [Review of the book The power of vision]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 150, 253-254.
  • Gangel, K. (1993). [Review of the book Visionary leadership]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 150, 252-253.
  • Gangel, K. (1994). [Review of the book A church for the 21st century: Bringing change to your church to meet the challenges of a changing society]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 151, 504.
  • Gangel, K. (1994). [Review of the book A history of Christian education]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 151, 504-505.
  • Gangel, K. (1994). [Review of the book The consumer church]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 151, 378.
  • Gangel, K. (1994). [Review of the book Leading the small church]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 151, 379.
  • Gangel, K. (1994). [Review of the book Transforming leadership: Jesus' way of creating vision, shaping values and empowering change]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 151, 251-252.
  • Gangel, K. (1994). [Review of the book Transforming the rough places: The ministry of supervision]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 151, 252-253.
  • Gangel, K. (1995). [Review of the book The American hour: A time of reckoning and the once and future role of faith]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 152, 248-249.
  • Gangel, K. (1995). [Review of the book Choosing to lead]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 152, 123-125.
  • Gangel, K. (1995). [Review of the book The Contemporary Christian]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 152, 102-103.
  • Gangel, K. (1995). [Review of the book Credibility]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 152, 250.
  • Gangel, K. (1995). [Review of the book Principles and practices of Christian education: An Evangelical perspective]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 152, 506-507.
  • Gangel, K. (1995). [Review of the book Racing toward 2001: The forces shaping America's religious future]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 152, 249-250.
  • Gangel, K. (1995). [Review of the book The teaching church: Moving Christian education to center stage]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 152, 384.
  • Gangel, K. (1996). [Review of the book The coming Evangelical crisis]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 153, 484-486.
  • Gangel, K. (1996). [Review of the book The confident leader: Getting a good start as a Christian minister]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 153, 504-505.
  • Gangel, K. (1996). [Review of the book Developing administrative excellence: Creating a culture of leadership]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 153, 255-256.
  • Gangel, K. (1996). [Review of the book The empowered leader: Ten keys to servant leadership]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 153, 504-505.
  • Gangel, K. (1996). [Review of the book The fall of the ivory tower]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 153, 505-507.
  • Gangel, K. (1996). [Review of the book The leader of the future]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 153, 507-508.
  • Gangel, K. (1997). [Review of the book Catch the age wave: A handbook of effective ministry with senior adults]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 154, 127-128.
  • Gangel, K. (1997). [Review of the book Models of religious education]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 154, 124-125.
  • Gangel, K. (1997). [Review of the book No little places: The untapped potential of the small-town church]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 154, 126.
  • Gangel, K. (1997). [Review of the book Rediscovering the soul of leadership: Inner disciplines for the effective leader]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 154, 504-505.
  • Gangel, K. (1997). [Review of the book Seeker and servant: The private writings of Robert Greenleaf]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 154, 253-255.
  • Gangel, K. (1998). [Review of the book Finding God at Harvard: Spiritual journeys of Christian thinkers]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 155, 122-124.
  • Gangel, K. (1999). [Review of the book The elements of teaching]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 156, 253-254.
  • Gangel, K. (2000). [Review of the book Leading without power]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 157, 121.
  • Gangel, K. (2000). [Review of the book The twenty-one irrefutable laws of leadership]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 157, 120-121.
  • Gangel, K. (2001). [Review of the book The word and power church]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 158, 251-252.
  • Gangel, K. (2001). [Review of the book Ministering to twenty-first century families]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 158, 383-384.

Reviews of Gangel's Publications

  • Benson, W. (1991). Feeding and leading: A practical Handbook on administration in churches and Christian organizations. [Review of the book Feeding and leading: A practical handbook on administration in churches and Christian organizations]. Christian Education Journal, 11,102-104.
  • Benson, W. (1993). The Christian educator's handbook on adult education. [Review of the book The Christian educator's handbook on adult education]. Trinity Journal, 14, 106-107.
  • Benson, Warren. (1994). Communication and conflict management in churches and Christian organizations. [Review of the book Communication and conflict management in churches and Christian organizations]. 14, 128-130.
  • Benson, W. (1995). The Christian educator's handbook on adult education. [Review of the book The Christian educator's handbook on adult education]. Christian Education Journal, 15, 110-111.
  • Cecil, D. (2004). Fathering like the father. [Review of the book Fathering like the father]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 161, 125.
  • Colwell, W. (1973). The family first. [Review of the book The family first]. Journal of Psychology &Theology, 1 (1), 88.
  • Edwards, D. (199?) Feeding and leading: A practical handbook on administration in churches and Christian organizations. [Review of the book Feeding and leading: A practical handbook on administration in churches and Christian organizations]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 146, 474-475.
  • Jordan, F. (1994). The Christian educator's handbook on adult education. [Review of the book The Christian educator's handbook on adult education]. Theological Educator: A Journal of Theology and Ministry, 49, 235-236.
  • Lamport, M. (1989). The Christian educator's handbook on teaching. [Review of the book Christian educator's handbook on teaching]. Evangelical Journal, 7, 91-92.
  • Kuske, D. (1998). The Christian educator's handbook on adult education. [Review of the book The Christian educator's handbook on adult education]. Wisconsin Lutheran Quarterly, 95 (4), 313.
  • McLaughlin, L. (2000). Ministering to today's adults. [Review of the book Ministering to today's adults]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 157, 254-255.
  • Parrett, G. (2004). Christian education: Its history and philosophy. [Review of the book Christian education: Its history and philosophy]. Christian Education Journal, 1, 180-185.
  • Teague, W (1990). Feeding and leading: A practical handbook on administration churches and Christian organizations. Review of the book Feeding and leading: A practical handbook on administration churches and Christian organizations]. Leadership, 11, 119-121.
  • Vyhmeister, N. (1995). The Christian educator's handbook on adult education. [Review of the book The Christian educator's handbook on adult education]. Andrews University Seminary Studies, 33, 299-300.
  • Walter, J. (1995). The Christian educator's handbook on adult education. [Review of the bookThe Christian educator's handbook on adult education]. Southwestern Journal of Theology, 37, 64.
  • Zuck, R. (2004). Genesis [Review of the book Genesis]. Bibliotheca Sacra, 161, 246.

Visual Material

  • Gangel, K. (1968). Enriching your teaching of the E.T.T.A. course understanding teaching: A guide of practical helps for those teaching the course to teachers and leaders in the church educational program (Video Recording). Wheaton, IL: Evangelical Teacher Training Association.
  • Gangel, K. (1968-1979). Understanding teaching: Visual material (Video Recording). Wheaton, IL: Evangelical Teacher Training Association.

Audio Material

  • Gangel, K. (1973). Leading a lively discussion.
  • Schaller, L., Munger, R., &Gangel, K. (1975). Catalyst a resource for Christian leaders.
  • Gangel, K. (1977). Christian higher education and contemporary culture: Slobbism or snobbism; developing a philosophy of teaching in Christian higher education: conditioning or indoctrination? W.H. Griffith Thomas Memorial Lectureship. Dallas, TX: Dallas Theological Seminary.
  • Gangel, K. (1977). The Christian leader looks at the Lord.
  • Gangel, K. (1977). Facing death realistically.
  • Gangel, K. (1977). Foundations for Christian higher education. W. H. Griffith Thomas Memorial Lectureship. Dallas, TX: Dallas Theological Seminary.
  • Narramore, C., Dirks, E., &Gangel, K. (1979). How to help the child, academically, socially and spiritually. Whitter, CA: Association of Christian Schools International.
  • Gangel, K. (198?). Corinthian crockpots. Albuquerque, NM.
  • Gangel, K. (198?). Teaching adults: A new approach to an old task. Alberquerque, NM.
  • Gangel, K. (1982). Church leadership and administration. Grand Rapids, MI: Institute of Theological Studies, Division of Outreach.
  • Gangel, K. (1982). Missions to international students.
  • Gangel, K. (1984). The administrator's competence. Waggoner, OK.
  • Gangel, K. (1984). How to survive in a superstar age.
  • Gangel, K. (1985). Motivation for what we do. Dallas, TX: Dallas Theological Seminary.
  • Gangel, K. (1985). The place at Parbar. Dallas, TX: Dallas Theological Seminary.
  • Gangel, K. (1987). The future of the local church. Albuquerque, NM.
  • Gangel, K. (1987). Leadership training for adults. Albuquerque, NM.
  • Gangel, K. (1988). Effective Christian leadership. Springfield, MO: Assemblies of God Theological Seminary.
  • Gangel, K. (1989). Fully persuaded that "He is able". Dallas, TX: Dallas Theological Seminary.
  • Gangel, K., &Canine, S. (1989). Interpersonal communication and conflict management in churches and Christian organizations. Grand Rapids, MI: Outreach, Inc.
  • Gangel, K., &Boice, J. (1990-1998). Gaebelein Colloquium all truth is God's truth! Dallas, TX: Dallas Theological Seminary.
  • Gangel, K. (1993). Task of the servant. Dallas, TX: Dallas Theological Seminary.
  • Gangel, K. (1994). Institutional program effectiveness assessment seminar #I. Michigan City, IN: SWA.
  • Gangel, K. (1994). Institutional long-range planning seminar #II. Michigan City, IN: SWA.
  • Gangel, K. (1994). Marketing Christian education seminar #III. Michigan City, IN: SWA.
  • Gangel, K. (1996). Adult ministries in the church. Grand Rapids, MI: Institute of Theological Studies.
  • Gangel, K. (1997). A personal testimony. Dallas, TX: Dallas Theological Seminary.
  • Gangel, K., &Benson, W. (1998). Christian education its history and philosophy. Lexington, KY: Lexington Volunteer Recording Unit.
  • Gangel, K. (2001). Team leadership in Christian ministry using multiple gifts to build a unified vision. Lexington, KY: Lexington Volunteer Recording Unit.

Excerpts from Publications

Gangel, K. (1983). Toward a harmony of faith and learning: Essays on bible college curriculum . Farmington Hills, MI: William Tyndale College Press.

Integration is " the forming or blending into a whole of everything that is a part of a Christian student's life and learning ." (Italics his, p. viii)" In the process of integration, it is essential not only that the teacher be able to integrate his subject matter with special revelation, but also that he teach students how to do it ." (Italics his, p. xi)

Gangel, K., & Gangel, E. (1987). Building a Christian family: A guide for parenting . Chicago, IL: Moody Press.

"Discipleship and leadership begin at home." (p. 11)

Gangel, K. (1989). Feeding & leading . Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.

"We have confused meekness with weakness, and attitude with act. A servant leader is characterized not by his doormat demeanor, but by the way he considers himself in relation to other members of the congregation (Phil. 2:1-5)." (p. 9)"Furthermore, feeding and leading are tasks for those who serve in parachurch organizations as well; and though the term would rarely be used, Christian school principals, college presidents, and mission board executives are also 'pastors.'" (p. 10)"The spiritual gift of leadership seems to emphasize serving others, personal care, and feeding which meets needs and encourages growth. Spiritual leadership as ministry is not giving orders but nurturing the people of God ." (Italics his, p. 39)

Gangel, K. (1997). Team leadership in Christian ministry: Using multiple gifts to build a unified vision . Chicago, IL: Moody Press.

"Team leadership is the exercise of one's spiritual gifts under the call of God to serve a certain group of people in achieving the goals God has given them toward the end of glorifying Christ." (p. 12)"Churches and Christian organizations have survived and thrived for two millennia on the services of volunteers… Churches and Christian organization should not only gear up to find, train and supervise volunteers, but they need to include them as a significant part of the overall leadership team." (p. 12)"To state it simply and yet biblically, the overwhelming and all-encompassing objective of the church is total Christian maturity for all its members. Total Christian maturity includes an individual and collective life of biblical worship, biblical fellowship, and biblical evangelism, all of which are stimulated by and produced through properly functioning team leadership." (p. 28)"Team leadership may be considered the exercise of certain qualities and abilities given by the Spirit of God and based in Christian character, which the group member, acting upon the call of God and the authority of His Word, will offer in loving service to the group for the sake of Christ." (pp. 91-92)"Effectiveness in mentoring is determined by a number of things: the degree of rapport we establish, the effectiveness of the process, and the willingness of the mentee to grow. In Christian mentoring… there resides a supernatural ingredient, both in the life of the leader and the learner, which introduces a dimension that can never play a role in secular mentoring. Christian leaders capitalize upon this factor as we apply the power of the Word of God, the supernatural dynamic of prayer, and the vitality of the Holy Spirit in every mentoring situation." (p. 270)"Servant leadership is an attitude with which we approach the leadership task; it is not bound by the situations in which we find ourselves, though certainly it is exercised more of less easily depending on the context." (p. 443)

Gangel, K. (2000). Coaching ministry teams: Leadership and management in Christian organizations . Nashville, TN: Word Publisher.

"The solution to victimization lies not in control but in confidence - confidence in God's call and His plan for your life and ministry, confidence in the team members you have placed around you to share ministry burdens and press forward with vision. You can be confident that your effectiveness does not rest in the number of people who agree with you but in your gentle, meek, wise and mature handling of change." (p. 100)"Effective leaders who reject mircromanagement set high standards and don't "dumb down" their expectations of ministry performance. They flex, they communicate, they hold people accountable, they train, and they evaluate. They trust people and expect them to serve God with excellence." (p. 116)" The only way you effectively empower other people is by giving them some of yours ." (Italics his, p. 161)

Gangel, K. & Gangel, J. (2003). Fathering like the Father: Becoming the dad God wants you to be . Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.

"… we believe that God's grace and truth can equip any dad and heal any home." (p. 14) "Teamwork is the key. Father and mother make up the most important team in the world (with the exception of husband and wife). When those combinations both operate at a reasonable level of competence, in accordance with biblical standards, they offer hope for society." (p. 163)


Recommended Readings

Gangel, K., & Benson, W. (1983). Christian education: Its history and philosophy . Chicago, IL: Moody Press.

Gangel teamed with Warren Benson to produce this excellent book on the history and philosophy of Christian education. The book is a great text for college or seminary classes on the history and philosophy of Christian education. The authors take the reader through history beginning with Old Testament theology and its influence on pedagogy, up through evangelical education at the end of the 20th century. Each chapter examines the contributions made to Christian education during a major era. These contributions may be from the overall philosophy of the time, as with Greek philosophy or that of major thinkers during the period, such as Horace Bushnell. This is an important text for anyone interested in how Christian education has been shaped and practiced throughout history.

Gangel, K. (1983). Toward a harmony of faith and learning: Essays on bible college curriculum . Farmington Hills, MI: William Tyndale College Press.

One of Gangel's foci in Christian education is the notion of integration of faith and learning. One can scarcely read a book by him without noticing how insights from the Bible and the world around him come together to form his philosophy of the topic. Gangel noticed that Christian liberal arts colleges, and Christian primary and secondary schools were focusing on the integration of faith and learning; however, the Bible Colleges were behind the curve on this topic and had virtually no help. Here Gangel serves as the editor for a book on the topic of integration specifically for the Bible College. He brings together insights from people in different fields, educational backgrounds, teaching experiences and thoughts about what integration is and how it should take place. Each contributing author is given a chapter in which to explain and illustrate his or her thoughts on integration and how it could occur in a Bible College curriculum. Anyone interested in the topic of integration, and specifically those teaching at Bible Colleges or preparing to teach in a Christian setting will find this collection beneficial to stir their thinking.

Gangel, K. & Gangel, E. (1987). Building a Christian family: A guide for parenting . Chicago, IL: Moody Press.

Kenn and his wife Elizabeth team up to provide Christians with an easy to read guide to Christian parenting. In the first major section of the book they devote three chapters to topics of making a distinctively Christian home. The second major division of the book examines how to raise children and the unique challenges of each age group. The final section of the book entails chapters on important topics such as discipline and punishment, family worship, playing together, choosing a school and being a single parent. The Gangels examine scripture and derive principles for "building a Christian family" which many families may find helpful. The questions at the end of each chapter will assist parents in thinking through how to implement the key ideas of the chapter in their family setting. The easy readability and brevity will also be a draw for many parents with little time, but a commitment to improving their familial bonds.

Gangel, K. (1989). Feeding & leading . Wheaton, IL: Victor Books.

Gangel addresses issues of leadership and how to develop lay leaders who can reproduce in the current book. As a leader himself, he brings his own experience to the book. As a student of the Word, he brings principles from Scripture, and as one with some training in business, he also offers principles from sociology and the world of business. In the end, he's always the teacher, as each chapter is easy to read and contains study questions for further thinking and practice. The end product, a series of chapters on topics from "Functioning as a Spiritual Leader" to "Chairing Business Meetings," is a solid resource tool for every Christian who finds him/herself in a position of leadership. With a focus on people over and above tasks, Gangel will surely challenge and stretch many who have bought into the world's model of leadership.

Gangel, K., & Hendricks, H. (Eds.). (1996). The Christian educator's handbook on teaching . Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.

As editor of the current volume, Gangel arranges twenty one chapters written by different people on their areas of expertise within the field of Christian education. The book serves as an excellent resource for anyone who teaches. It can also function as a solid text for a college or seminary class that focuses on the various issues in teaching. Gangel divides the twenty one chapters into four parts based on topic. The first part assists the person in thinking through crucial questions in developing one's philosophy of Christian education. The second main section entails chapters that give advice on teaching children and youth, as well as issues in methodology. The third group of chapters focuses on three key roles of the Christian teacher; namely, as leader, discipler, and Bible student. In the final division, the contributing authors offer insight in various venues of Christian teaching; such as the college, church, home and family.

Gangel, K. (1997). Team leadership in Christian ministry: Using multiple gifts to build a unified vision . Chicago, IL: Moody Press.

After years of leading and teaching classes on leadership, Gangel noticed a disconnection between the New Testament focus on team leadership and the current practices of individual leadership. In this work, Gangel seeks to help Christian leaders build leadership teams and provides them with the necessary material to train others to build teams. To achieve his goal, Gangel cites Christian as well as well as secular sources on leadership along with the Biblical text. He addresses three elements throughout the book: 1) leadership as an ability, 2) working with people is essential in leadership, and 3) the necessity of progressing toward a goal (p. 12). Foundations of team leadership, the roles of a leader and the functions of a leadership team are the major sections of the work. The book would serve as an excellent textbook for a class on leadership. It would also be an excellent resource for anyone working as a leader or training leaders.

Gangel, K. (2000). Coaching ministry teams: Leadership and management in Christian organizations . Nashville, TN: Word Publisher.

Gangel uses the metaphor of coaching a team to illustrate how ministry should function. Instead of the pastor or other leader doing everything, s/he should train and empower those gifted to use their gifts. Such a view of ministry puts value back in the work of lay leaders. Gangel reveals the barrenness of the "cult of personality" in ministry. He insists that the leader is more like a coach who empowers his players to become a winning team. He integrates insight from the Bible, team sports, and business to support his points. Chapter topics include, "Creative Administration," "Effective Followership," "Strategic Planning," "Empowering Others," "Team Relationships" and "Team Process". As part of the Swindoll Leadership Library, this book is excellent for pastors with or without formal seminary training and for lay leaders in the church. Certainly, Gangel's approach to ministry as a collection of people with various gifts working together for a common goal will seem refreshing to many.

Gangel, K., & Gangel, J. (2003). Fathering like the Father: Becoming the dad God wants you to be . Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books.

Kenn Gangel teamed with his son Jeff to write Fathering like the Father. Kenn and Jeff put their finger into a gaping American wound. They cite Colin Powell, "Nearly 40% of our children are growing up without a father at home." (p. 76) Of course that does not speak to the fathers who are physically at home but not emotionally engaged with their children. They approach the problem by identifying fifteen different attitudes or behaviors which affect parent child dynamics. Then, having identified and described the issue, they each tell part of their personal story. Because Kenn grew up without a dad, he reflects on what he missed, wished he had experienced, or tried to develop with his son Jeff. Jeff, on the other hand, reflects on the wonderful relationship with Kenn both as he was growing and now as an adult. Kenn's experience should give hope to women who must raise a boy alone… he didn't turn out so bad after all. Jeff's experience should encourage every caring father that all the effort really pays big dividends through your whole life. Kenn and Jeff return again and again to the Father image of God. "So, God models faithful leadership for us, and we model faithful leadership for everyone else in the family. Perhaps that especially relates to our sons whom, from their earliest years, we groom into the next generation of fathers and church leaders." (p. 121) They also pack the book with numerous stories and anecdotes. The book sets out to accomplish three goals, "… Christian dads serving as communicators of God's revelation, conversationalists with the heavenly Father, and commendable examples of godly fathering on earth." (p. 13) Thoughtful fathers will find bountiful help in all three areas.


Author Information

Carisa Ash

No information available.

Michael S. Lawson

Michael S. Lawson (Ph.D., Oklahoma University) currently serves as Chairman and Senior Professor of Christian Education at Dallas Theological Seminary. He has known Kenneth Gangel for 19 years. Kenn recruited Michael and served as his department chair in the Christian Education department. When Kenn became Dallas Theological Seminaries Academic Dean, Michael served as chairman of the Christian Education Department. Carisa A. Ash (Th.M., Dallas Theological Seminary), is currently a Ph.D. student at Dallas Theological Seminary.

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