Protestant Educators

Picture of Oneal C. Sandidge

Oneal Cleaven Sandidge (August 13, 1955 – Present) was born in Lynchburg, Virginia.  While his principal denominational affiliation is in the Baptist tradition, he has been served in several denominations.  A noted scholar, writer, and workshop presenter, Dr. Sandidge has contributed widely to the area of Christian education as a prolific writer and theorist, as a dynamic pastor and teacher, and as an effective Christian education administrator.  Dr. Oneal Sandidge’s Doctor of Ministry dissertation topic “Selecting Sunday School Literature in the Black Church was a ground- breaking research related to the Black church Sunday school for Christian education.  He also served as Professor of Christian Education for more than twenty years as well as more than seventeen years as a public school teacher. He served a mega church in New York City as one of the first full-time paid Directors of Christian Education in a black congregation in New York and was a national lecturer and writer. Dr. Sandidge currently serves as Visiting Project General Developer and Editor of Interdenominational Theological Center (I.T.C.) for Fall 2014/Spring 2015 Special Journal Edition Publication on Christian Education: “Teaching the Faith, Claiming the Promise: Black Perspectives on Christian Education in the 21st Century.”  He is also considered by the United Theological Seminary in Ohio, and nationally, as an expert in Christian Education. He is a national lecturer, workshop leader, and consultant in Christian education.

Biography

Early Life

Dr. Sandidge has been an active Christian since his childhood.  He became a member of the Timothy Baptist Church at the age of twelve. He organized a youth Helping Hands Club, served as an usher, was a member of the junior choir, and organized the church’s first gospel choir. During his teen years, Dr. Oneal Sandidge became an American Red Cross First-Aid and CPR instructor in Amherst County. Also, Dr. Sandidge was a member of the Amherst, Virginia N.A.A.C.P. where he served on the education committee to fight for equal rights. He was active in the Amherst County, Virginia Voter’s League.

Dr. Oneal Sandidge is the son of the late Wardie and Hattie Dawson Sandidge of Amherst, Virginia. Dr. Sandidge is the husband of Janice Cheryl Sandidge. He has two children: Ieke Monique and Jermaine Oneal; two godsons: Rev Ronnie Clark and Eric Baskerville; seven grandchildren: Mekhi Oneal Sandidge, Alyssa K. Barrett, Amea Harvey, Akeria Harvey,  Nadyia Clark, Eric M. Baskerville, Jr. and  J’Allen Clark.

Dr. Sandidge began teaching cousins in his neighborhood (when they played school and church between age ten and twelve.) At age thirteen, Dr. Sandidge began teaching in the Timothy Baptist Church, Amherst, Virginia. He gives credit to the late Deacon George Massie and his parents, the late Wardie and Hattie Sandidge, who encouraged him to attend Sunday School. Dr. Oneal Sandidge has a strong religious background. He began not only teaching young people in Sunday school but sang in various church and community singing groups, which led Dr. Sandidge to participate in community work in his hometown, Amherst County, Virginia.

Community Work

Dr. Oneal Sandidge grew up in Amherst County, Virginia. He was a member of the NAACP and Voter’s League of Amherst County. He also served as secretary for the Amherst County Ministerial Association. In addition, Dr. Sandidge was a notary in Amherst County. He was commissioned by the Amherst County NAACP to attend a predominately white elementary school in the sixties during segregation. He was the only black student in his class, and there were approximately no more than ten blacks in the entire school. Mr. Robert Flowers, principal and teacher, and Mrs. Campbell, teacher, were his unforgettable teachers. As Dr. Sandidge worked within communities, he saw the need to spread teaching God’s Word through gospel singing.

Gospel Singing

Dr. Oneal Sandidge is known as the youngest promoter of professional singers in Central Virginia. At age 16-17, he began promoting professional singing groups in Lynchburg, Virginia to help persons revive their lives through music. He further became a member of St. Paul’s College traveling Gospel Choir and St. Paul’s Concert Choir. He was president of his home church gospel choir. In addition, Dr. Sandidge was manager of several gospel singing groups from the 70’s- 90’s: The Mighty Wonders Gospel Singers of Amherst, Virginia, The Love of God Gospel Singers of Rustburg, Virginia, Rapture Gospel Singers, The Gospel Three of Lynchburg, Virginia, and The Voices for God of Lynchburg, Virginia. He worked with most of the professional gospel giants, Willie Banks and the Messengers, Slim and the Supremes, Shirley  Caesar, Sister Lucille Pope and the Pearly Gates, The Angelic Gospel Singers, the Lumzy Sisters, the Jackson Southernaires, and the Mighty Clouds of Joy, to name a few. His anniversaries were usually full to capacity. This connection caused many Blacks to respect the personhood of Dr. Sandidge and led many to Christian education developments in various localities and churches. Many persons who worked with Dr. Sandidge continued teaching in the church and accepted the call to preach the Gospel. Dr. Sandidge’s work with singing groups and singing led him to the call to ministry.

The Call to Ministry

Dr. Sandidge was called to preach the Gospel in 1977. He preached his initial sermon and was licensed by his home church, the Timothy Baptist Church in Amherst, Virginia. In 1979 he became ordained to serve as pastor. Dr. Sandidge became licensed and ordained to preach the Gospel by his home church under the leadership of Rev. George Bolden. He served three churches: White Rock Baptist Church in Arrington, Virginia, from 1979-1984; Greater Peaceful Zion in Lynchburg, Virginia, from 1984-1987, and Second Buffalo Baptist Church in Nathalie, Virginia, from 1988-1991. His call to ministry led him to serve as pastor.

The Call to Serve as Pastor

During the course of his serving as pastor, Dr. Sandidge organized ministries to promote Christian education He served Second Buffalo Baptist Church, Nathalie, Virginia, in various capacities from 1990-1993. He improved church attendance from 100 to 500 within the first year. He served as pastor, 1983-1986, at the Greater Peaceful Zion Baptist Church, Lynchburg, Virginia; Dr. Oneal Sandidge improved the church’s growth from 50 to 300 within one year. The educational ministries were reenergized. In addition, he served as pastor at White Rock Baptist Church from 1979-1983. He improved church attendance from 25 to 100 within first year and improved the church educational program. His church leadership taught him to continue his education.

Educational Studies

Dr. Sandidge studied under many top professors. He studied under Dr. James Campbell at Lynchburg College, who taught him writing skills. His favorite undergraduate professor was Joann Ashbury. She inspired him to use creativity as she did in a class entitled “Teaching P.E. for Teachers.” In the 1980’s, Dr. Oneal Sandidge attended Howard University and was inspired by Dr. Cain Hope Felder and Dr. Dolores Carpenter. He sought his first doctorate in religion and became inspired by Dr. Marian Poindexter at Drew University. When he attended Teacher’s College, Columbia University, the oldest and largest graduate school in education in the United States founded by Horace Mann, the Father of Education, Dr. Sandidge was one of few blacks in extremely large classes, some which were held in auditoriums. Dr. Oneal Sandidge was inspired by his graduate school professors at Columbia/Teacher’s College: Dr. Lagemann and Dr. Lawrence Cremin, Professors of Public Policy, Dr. Maxine Greene, Professor of Philosophy, all renowned writers and scholars in education. Dr. Oneal Sandidge also cross-registered for classes at the Jewish Theological Seminary where he met Dr. Suzan Johnson, a classmate. Dr. Joseph Lukinsky was the professor for one of the classes. During the time spent at Teacher’s College in New York, Dr. Sandidge cross-registered and took classes at Union Theological Seminary in New York. At Union Theological Seminary, Dr. Sandidge met Dr. James Cone, a well-known Professor of Black Theology. Dr. Sandidge crossed paths again with Dr. Cone at Drew University.  Dr. Oneal Sandidge took classes under Dr. James Forbes, one of the reknown preachers and Professor of Homiletics. Dr. Forbes taught Dr. Sandidge modern preaching styles for both white and black congregations.  He not only learned preaching techniques but how to teach during preaching. In addition, Dr. Sandidge took classes at Union Theological Seminary in New York under the late Dr. Melvin Washington, a renowned Professor of History of the Black Church. It was Dr. Washington who prophesied and prayed over Dr. Sandidge that Dr. Oneal Sandidge should enroll in the D. Min Program at Drew University and pursue the Ed.D. later. Dr. Sandidge was enrolled in two full-time programs: the Ed. D at Columbia University and the

D. Min. at Drew University. He traveled weekly from Madison, New Jersey, to New York City.  Dr. Sandidge had just completed his coursework at Columbia-Teacher’s College and was inducted into the Kappa Delta Honor Society.  Dr. Sandidge was at the doctoral comprehensive exam stage at Columbia-Teacher’s College and had just completed all but one exam prior to applying to the dissertation stage. He accepted a second Masters Degree and continued to finish the Doctor of Ministry at Drew University. At Drew University, Marian Poindexter, Professor of Christian Education, and Dr. Dean Trulear inspired Dr. Sandidge very much. Dr. Sandidge applied and was granted admission to Harvard University in the early nineties. He taught public schools for two days a week in Petersburg, Virginia, acquired a substitute to teach the other days, and then he traveled to Cambridge, Massachusetts to complete the Merrill Fellow’s Program at Harvard University, where many persons inspired Dr. Sandidge. He was most moved by Mr. Merrill, an entrepreneur who funded the Merrill’s Fellow Program. All course work and a stipend were provided in addition to the great opportunity for Dr. Sandidge to excel in course work and meet top scholars at Harvard.

Years later Dr. Sandidge pursued the Ph.D. Degree from Capella University where Dr. Marsha Covington and Dr. Lowe from Erskine Seminary became his greatest mentor and dissertation advisors and who motivated his critical thinking skills. Most of the educational studies led Dr. Oneal Sandidge to accept positions as teacher and dean.

Teaching Experience and Deanship

Dr. Sandidge began teaching all middle school grades and all middle school subjects in the late seventies off and on for a total of eighteen years in schools systems in Virginia to Maryland until 2000. He would often teach public school and serve as dean of a college in Fort Washington, Maryland, during the same week. He taught Christian education courses in the early eighties at a college in his hometown, Virginia Seminary, known now as Virginia University. In the early nineties, Dr. Sandidge’s taught at Beulah Heights Bible College, now known as Beulah University. His students at Beulah University were amazed by his gift of prophecy, his teaching, and his creativity. Dr. Sandidge would do creative things, i.e., lead students in a funeral processional to demonstrate that old things are dead and new adventures are needed. In one class, he discussed how students and pastors should be educated about cults and non-religious groups. He taught a class on Apologetics. In another experience while teaching for Urban Ministries in the early nineties, Dr. Sandidge made a coffin with cardboard and placed flowers around the coffin to show attendees that it is too late to teach the dead. Dr. Sandidge led a Maryland public school writing contest for National Education Week in the late nineties. One of his students won first place and greatly appreciated teaching English to her class. Dr.  Sandidge also contributed to more than twenty scholarly articles in Christian education. In addition, Dr. Oneal Sandidge taught all middle school, grades 4-8, and all subjects with his last seven years teaching middle school English.  The Associate Professor of Christian Education taught many subjects at Beulah University during the nineties. Dr. Sandidge taught Urban Youth Ministry, Teaching Bible Study, Administration of the Christian School, Teaching Prayer, Apologetics, Creative Teaching, Fundamentals of Bible Study, Youth Ministry, John and Acts, and Introduction to Christian Education. His students were impressed with his unique creativity in classes. His classes would become quickly closed/full because of Dr. Sandidge’s multi-faceted style of teaching. He also served as adjunct Professor of Christian Education at Luther Rice Seminary in Lithonia, Georgia. Dr. Sandidge was one of few minorities who taught at Luther Rice Seminary. Dr. Sandidge recalls when he took the bus from Beulah University to Lithonia, Georgia, and walked about a mile to teach at Luther Rice Seminary. He taught Christian Education: Philosophy of Christian Education, Curriculum Development, History of Christian Education, Teaching Methods, and Survey of Christian Education. Much later he taught at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia. Some of the courses included online Bible (Old Testament) graduate courses, Church Leadership, Evangelism, and he taught over 4,000 students online ranging from 4-6 courses per semester,  8 weeks term- six to 8 terms per year. He taught Educational Research to over 100 graduate students and served on a dissertation committee, reading dissertations for doctoral learners. His national work touched the lives of many persons. He is a pioneer in Christian education for the Black church. Dr. Sandidge’s consultations with the late Grant Shockley and Dr. Jonathan Jackson were invaluable. Serving as pastor, preaching, teaching, and other experiences led Dr. Sandidge to serve as a director of a mega church.

Service as Director of Christian Education in a Mega-Church

He has served a mega church in New York City, Convent Avenue Baptist Church, where the late Pastor Clarence Grant served as pastor. Dr. Oneal Sandidge was responsible for leading thirty-five ministries, four departmental superintendents, and one general superintendent. His teaching and leading caused the Department of Education to flourish. Dr. Sandidge was also responsible for training and monitoring 75 plus church school teachers, in charge of teacher and staff evaluations, and was the person responsible for hiring and firing staff and responsible for the Board of Christian Education.  Dr. Sandidge approved and monitored a $150,000 budget, approved requisitions, and provided disbursements to ministries. Dr. Sandidge also was responsible to preach or invite preachers to the college noon day mid-week service. Serving as director of Christian education provided Dr. Sandidge an opportunity to use all of his experiences and to begin more in-depth writing related to the African American Church Department of Christian Education.

Writing Experience             

Dr. Oneal Sandidge began writing in high school. He published a small pamphlet of poems related to the experience. He also entered many contests. He recalled the time when he served as supervisor for the day at Lynchburg General Hospital as a result of a high school writing contest where he won first prize. In the eighties, he sought to combine educational and practical experiences and begin writing books. He is currently the author of six books in Christian education. Dr. Sandidge’s published dissertation Selecting Sunday School Literature in the Black Church in the early nineties helped shaped many church Christian education programs. He recalls when his assistant, Rev. Ronnie Clark, used a typewriter to type his papers. One day the typewriter exploded, and he had to turn to other technology. Dr Sandidge’s books are based on research and practical experiences. Four of his titles were written while serving Convent Avenue Baptist Church in New York. Serving in a mega church afforded Dr. Sandidge many experiences to see in action what was missing from African American church ministry program.

National Attention

Dr. Sandidge has national attention in Christian education. Dr. Oneal Sandidge led national level workshops/lectures for the United Methodist Convention, where he taught parishioners and church leaders how to improve Christian education in the local church. He also served the Hampton’s Minister’s Conference as lecturer in Christian education and panelist for the first Christian Education Minister’s Conference, Hampton University located in Hampton, Virginia in the early nineties. In addition, Dr. Sandidge served Urban Ministry, Chicago, Illinois, for many years as a workshop leader. He also served the Presbyterian Church Convention USA at a Washington, DC meeting. Dr. Sandidge was respected in Christian education by other groups. He served the A.M.E. Zion Convention speaker/workshop leader in Christian education. Dr. Oneal Sandidge was also recognized by the A.M.E. church for his intellect in Christian education. He served the A.M.E. Convention as speaker/workshop leader.


Contributions to Christian Education

As writer of this project, Dr. Oneal Sandidge’s impact on Christian Education in the African American church is remarkable. Dr. Sandidge stated how he impacted Christian education in the Black Church as:

1.     …recommended an A-Z plan for Christian educators

2.     …recommended an approach to lesson planning specifically to African American church teachers

3.     …completed the third ground-breaking research on the African American Sunday school

4.     …reorganized an entire department of Christian education at a mega church in New York City. The model has been recognized by many educators and church leaders. Such model is seen vividly in the book Strategies for the Director of Christian Education in the African American Church

5.     …provided a recognized and fresh approach research to the History of the Black Sunday school

6.     …provided an array of resources specifically for the African American church

7.     …recommended a fresh approach for organizing a youth ministry in the African American church

8.     …provided suggestions to various pastors and church leaders who attended Dr. Sandidge’s  national lecturers and workshops

9.     …spoke at conferences to aid pastors and church leaders how to improve church ministries and how to organize all ministries

10.  …produced a model for directors of Christian education to organize or re-organize a Board of Christian Education

11.  …created a model for training ministry leaders how to organize each church ministry

12.  …created DVD’s and PowerPoints to assist pastors and church leaders to improve church ministries

13.  …preached and taught churches the Gifts of the Holy Spirit and put in action how God gifted Dr. Sandidge in the area of prophecy/gifts of discernment which differs from being a prophet

14.  …one of the first deans at Arkansas Baptist College to be recognized for his recommended program in Christian education/religion at a Deans of Religion Banquet for Dr. Sandidge at the President Clinton Hotel in Little Rock, Arkansas

15.  … served on the executive committee, where he served as college dean, by participating in a phone conference with the Obama administration as he assisted with the Fathers Initiative Program at Arkansas Baptist College

16.  …served as the chief person for promoting religion and evaluating and hiring faculty who taught in a religious studies program at Arkansas Baptist College

17.  …served as the lead reviewer of a model tested for online religious education

18.  …taught at one of the churches, where he served, how to end the barrier of women nonparticipating in Bible discussion during Bible study due to an old philosophy that women did not have the right to comment on Scripture. He presented Scriptural references and brought an end to the practice that women could only read Scripture during Bible study while serving as pastor

 

After reviewing Dr. Sandidge’s contributions to Christian education in the Black church, it is my pleasure to elaborate upon a few of them.

It was my privilege to write the Foreword to one of his books, Beyond the Classroom. Some of my statements were:

In this very thorough treatise on the education of the teacher in a Christian education setting, Dr. Sandidge provides the reader with a solid A-Z plan for equipping Christian educators. The author not only provides a comprehensive teacher training package, but he also builds this package on the foundation of Scripture. This manual approach not only addresses the gift of teaching of the prospective teacher, but also presents an administrative framework for those who are planning and coordinating teacher training in the localchurch( ix ).

I am impressed that Dr. Sandidge not only is a licensed and ordained minister in the Baptist church; he has been a college professor, a dean, and completed the third ground-breaking research related to the African American Church. In the nineties, Dr. Sandidge’s D. Min. dissertation produced a ground-breaking research, which brought together six major denominations, including the National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc., to learn how to review curriculum in the black church and to learn up-dates on what was going on in the Black church’s Christian education program. Dr. Sandidge was given permission to speak to a national convention body and distributed surveys to learn more about church leader’s views about Christian education in the Black church. After Dr. Sandidge completed his dissertation, the study was purchased by David C. Cook Publishing Company, a company which produces Sunday school literature for the Black church. The Summa Cum Laude Ph.D. scholar also holds two Masters and a Doctor of Ministry. Dr. Sandidge completed his undergraduate work at Lynchburg College in Lynchburg, Virginia. He then completed a Masters in Religious Education from Howard University School of Divinity. He also completed a second Masters from Columbia University where he had a tri-focus: Christian education, History of the Black Church and History of American Education. Later he completed the Doctor of Ministry with his dissertation on Selecting Sunday School Literature in the Black Church; then, he completed the Ph.D. from Capella University with his dissertation on “Student Perspectives of Classroom Discussion in an African American Institution.” He completed his research at Howard University under the leadership of Dr. Cain Hope Felder.

In addition, Dr. Sandidge contributions include being recognized by Lynchburg College in Lynchburg, Virginia to receive the Lynchburg College Carey-Brewer Alumni Award for his work in the community as a Christian educator. Dr. Sandidge is known nationally for his service in Christian education.

What others say about Dr. Oneal Sandidge

There are many comments about Dr. Oneal Sandidge’s background:

Dr. Maria Harris, a renowned author in Christian education, stated in her Foreword for Dr. Sandidge’s Book, Strategies for the Director of Christian Education in the African American Church:

The author leads us into this understanding and this is excellent in many ways. First, he creates a Framework. Second, he uses numerous angles of vision to enable us                    to see what he sees. And finally, throughout the book, he acts as our teacher, subtly instructing us by the many ways he goes about presenting the materials. In this

introductory Foreword, I shall comment on each of these, even as I recognize that I could have chosen many other ways of working that the uses as he--and the Lord--help us to explore the vocation of Director of Christian Education in the African American Church.(ix)

The late Dr. Keith Chism considered Dr. Oneal Sandidge as an expert in Christian education and one of the most valuable resourceful persons for guiding Christian education in the Black church.

Dr. Charles Foster reviewed Dr. Sandidge’s book Strategies for the Director of Christian education. Dr. Foster stated:

Dr. Sandidge has produced another important guide for strengthening the quality of the congregation’s education. But it is more than a practical guide; the depth of its insights into church education leadership are grounded in the educational wisdom of the Bible and the educational heritage of ancient Africa.

Dr. Marshall Johnson, Editorial Director of Fortress Press, commented about the book, Strategies:

The plan and focus of your project are attractive in several aspects. You seem to have read widely in several areas ad to have developed a fine model that can accomplish the synthesis you aim at.

Dr. Michael Battle, Sr. wrote that; “ Dr. Sandidge’s book, Teacher Training, has presented a most urgently needed resource for the African American church…Every person involved in the Christian Educational Ministry of the church will be greatly aided by the attention Dr. Sandidge gives to the critical role of evaluating the teacher and literature used in the Sunday School Department.”

Dr. Gloria Taylor, Assistant Professor of Christian Education at Virginia Union University, School of Theology, wrote how the book I’m Stuck: Help Me Start a Youth Ministry in the African American Church was helpful: “ The book lives up to its title. It will definitely help you get started planning youth ministry.” Dr. Chris Jackson, Collegiate Ministry Specialist wrote: “Oneal Sandidge offers keen insight and a fresh and challenging perspective to the important-but-overlooked area of youth ministry in the African American church. Read and be blessed.”

He re-organized Sunday schools and Bible-study classes in churches where he served as pastor. In the 1980's, Dr. Sandidge organized a prayer group in his hometown, Amherst, Virginia and held revivals and teachings under a tent on a baseball field. As an educator, he traveled more than 100 miles from Lynchburg, Virginia, to seek theological education at Howard University and travel during the first year to and from Lynchburg to preach revivals, teaching, and serving a church in Lynchburg, Virginia. The spirited leader taught and led people to Christ. Many became preachers, many were saved, and others attended for a spiritual renewal.  Dr. Oneal Sandidge served as one of the first full-time professors in Christian education in the 1980's at Virginia Seminary and College in Lynchburg, Virginia, now known as Virginia University, a historic Black university.

As writer of this nominee, I personally worked with Dr. Sandidge in the early nineties as he taught in the Deans’ and Presidents’ Division for National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc. Later I endorsed one of his books, Beyond the Classroom that alluded to training persons to become better Christian educators. Dr. Sandidge had four of his book titles first published by Sunday School Publishing Board, a division of National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc.. All of his titles were rated highly for Christian education. 

Awards and Recognitions

Dr. Oneal Sandidge is the recipient of many awards. They include, the Who’s Who Among Black Americans 2010-2011, the Labbe Award 2005, Los Angeles Book Expo (Don’t’ Have a Messed Up Sunday School), Christian Author’s Education and Youth Ministry Award 2004, Memphis Black Writers Conference, Christian Writer’s Hall of Fame 2005, Who’s Who Among African-Americans, 2006, Who’s Who In the World, 2001, listed in 1,000 Leaders of World Influence, 2000, listed in Outstanding People of the Twentieth Century, 2000, 2nd Ed., listed in Who’s Who International, 2000, recognized in the Dictionary of International Biographies, 2000. He is also listed in the Who’s Who of the Southwest, 2000, Who’s Who in America, 2000, 54th Ed, listed in the Who’s Who Among African-Americans, 1999-2000, and authored a major paper for the American Academy of Religion: Paper on “Feminist Theology,” Converse College, 1988.

PUBLISHED BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

Dr. Oneal Sandidge is listed in the 2014 Who’s Who in America and Who’s Who in the World. He is listed in the 2013 Executive Who’s Who Global. In addition, Dr. Sandidge is listed in the Who’s Who Among Black Americans 2010-2011, the Who’s Who Among African-Americans, 2006, the Who’s Who In the World, 2001, listed in 1,000 Leaders of World Influence, 2000, listed in Outstanding People of the Twentieth Century, 2000, 2nd Ed., listed in Who’s Who International, 2000, recognized in the Dictionary of International Biographies, 2000. He is also listed in the Who’s Who of the Southwest, 2000, Who’s Who in America, 2000, 54th Ed, and listed in the Who’s Who Among African-Americans, 1999-2000.

 


Bibliography

Sandidge, O. (Revised Edition, 2012). A book to change your life: The pastor’s life, and church leadership about ministry- A how to do ministry handbook. Maitland, FL: Xulon Press.

Sandidge, O. (Revised Edition, 2012). Don’t have a messed-up Sunday school. Bloomington, IN: AuthorHouse

Sandidge, O. (2010). A book to change your life: The pastor’s life, and church leadership about ministry- A how to do ministry handbook. Maitland, FL: Xulon Press.

Sandidge, O. (2009-2010 released-Journal completed 2006-2007). The African Sermon as a Teaching Tool. Journal of Religious Thought.  DC: Howard University Press.

Sandidge, O. (2008). How to teach learners to create an effective online discussion. Distance Learning Administration 2008 Conference. Jekyll Island, GA.

Sandidge, O. (2007). Student perceptions of classroom discussion in an African American institution of higher learning. Ph.D. dissertation. Microfilm Abstracts.

Sandidge, O. (2003). Don’t have a messed-up Sunday school. Bloomington, IN: Author House.

September Eleven Maryland Voices. “The terrorist attack did not discriminate—poem.” and “The color of life book—poem” “Set positive goals.”

Sandidge, O. (2002). Teacher quit all the talking: The Christian Education Informer, 54(4). Nashville, TN: SSPB.

Sandidge, O. (2002). Can your students read scripture without knowing the vocabulary: The Christian Education Informer, 53(3)? Nashville, TN: SSPB.

Sandidge, O. (2001). Beyond the classroom. Nashville, TN: SSPB.

Sandidge, O. (2001). Strategies for the director of Christian education. Nashville, TN: SSPB.

Sandidge, O. (2001). Training African American church leaders in the new millennium. Nashville, TN: SSPB.

Sandidge, O. (2000). Assessing your students. The Christian Education Informer, 53(2). Nashville, TN: SSPB.

Sandidge, O. (2000). Back to basics: teaching teenagers at home and at school: The Christian Education Informer, 52(4). Nashville, TN: SSPB.

Sandidge, O. (2000). Twelve teaching tips for church educators: The Christian Education Informer, 52(4). Nashville, TN: SSPB.

Sandidge, O. (Dec. 1999- Jan. 2000). Teaching and the Holy Spirit: The Christian Education Informer, 52(3). Nashville, TN: SSPB.

Sandidge, O. (1999). A cake recipe to help pastors create a strong foundation for developing a Christian education program: The Christian Education Informer, 52(2). Nashville, TN: SSPB.

Sandidge, O. (1999). Students should be taught various pieces of the puzzle before leaving your class: The Christian Education Informer, 52(2). Nashville, TN: SSPB.

Sandidge, O. (1999). What do people need to know about Christian education in the church? : The Christian Education Informer, 52(2). Nashville, TN: SSPB.

Sandidge, O. (1998). Teacher -training in the African-American church. Nashville, TN: SSPB.

Sandidge, O. (1998). I’m stuck! Help me start a youth ministry in the African-American church. Nashville, TN: SSPB.

Sandidge, O. (Dec. 1995-Jan. 1996). Whosoever will come? Church School Today Leader. Nashville, TN: Abingdon Press.

Sandidge, O. (1995).  Evaluating curriculum. Church School Today Leader. Nashville, TN: Abingdon Press.

Sandidge, O. (1992). The uniqueness of black preaching. The Journal of Religious Thought, 49(1). Washington DC: Howard University.

Sandidge, O. (1992). Tracing gospel roots with Professor Thomas Dorsey. Score Gospel Magazine, 3(1). Nashville, TN.

Sandidge, O. (January-February 1992). Black history.  Virginia Education Association Journal

Sandidge, O. (1991). Book review of book. Black religious leaders–Conflict in unity. Journal of Black Scholars, 22(3). Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin.

SPECIAL PRESENTATIONS

Sandidge, O. (2008). How to teach learners to create an effective online discussion. Distance Learning Administration 2008 Conference. Jekyll Island, GA.

Black History Month Presenter—Liberty University, 2007.

Sandidge, O. (2005). History of the Black Church. Conference Presenter—Association for African American Historical Research and Preservation, Second Annual Conference—Seattle, WA.

BIBLIOGRAPHY OF REVIEWS

            There are many places to find resources on Dr. Oneal Sandidge. An Internet Search: Dr. Oneal Sandidge or Oneal Sandidge will provide much information about Dr. Oneal Sandidge. One may find him listed in the Hall of Fame of Lynchburg College, Lynchburg, Virginia and the Memphis Writer’s Hall of Fame of Writers. The following locations include but not limited to: Amazon.com, Barnes and Nobles, Quantum Healing, NotADoc.org, Dissertation Abstracts, Liberty University and other libraries, Modern Foundations of Quantum, A Case for Life PDF, Xulon Press, Sunday School Publishing Board, Author House, and Kindle Books. 


Excerpts from Publications

Sandidge, O. (2001). Beyond the classroom. Nashville, TN: SSPB.

Have you ever wondered why some Christians may be so confused? Why are some Christians always fuzzy in faith, church doctrine, and biblical facts? Why do many learners despise attending church activities, including the church school? Why do some church teachers desire to give up or quit, because they are tired of teaching? All questions focus on the need for educating teachers in all churches, including the African American church. Beyond the Classroom presents old, new, and future considerations to help manage, plan, and implement learning experiences for those who thirst and hunger for God or perhaps appear to be at an attained spiritual level.

His stance: Many church ministries are dead, unhealthy, not doing the Will of God, and not helping people, because leaders are not trained to do ministry. Much of this is because the pastor does not attend to the training of ministry leaders.

 

Sandidge, O. (Revised Edition, 2012). A book to change your life: The pastor’s life, and church leadership about ministry- A how to do ministry handbook. Maitland, FL: Xulon Press.

Why do people attend church?  People attend church to unite as one body to serve God.  God’s “Word” helps us to spiritually awaken to our purpose.  The pastor delivers the “Word” in various styles.  What does the church do after hearing the “Word”?  Is the church preparing members for telling the Good News?  After teaching for many years, it is easy to conclude that we need to teach people how to live and how to help others to live.

 

Sandidge, O. (2001). Strategies for the director of Christian education. Nashville, TN: SSPB

Christian education helps the African American church to realize why many parishioners seek sources other than the church when struggles appear. Some leaders of Christian education are not prepared because of their limited knowledge about Christian education. A church may have a Christian education program, but if leaders do not know how to develop and implement the program, the program becomes null. Christian education does have an important place in society. Many times, non-Christian educational sources do not provide knowledge to us about spiritual growth, do not help us to understand our desires, and do not help us to cope with our problems.

This book will suggest ideas that will help prepare directors of Christian education for guiding and leading a Christian education program in the African American church. Many suggestions are also helpful to directors serving non-African American churches. This book will also help seminary and college professors, denominational leaders, and directors of Christian education. In addition, this book will provide insights for parishioners in understanding Christian education in the African American church. This book will also help leaders in non-African American churches to learn effective ways to prepare Christian education for African Americans. Christian education is the foundation needed to prepare persons for living. Christian education reminds Blacks why education is important. Christian educational programs encourage one to seek further education in public schools, colleges, and theological seminaries. They also increase Sunday church school attendance.

This book consists of eight chapters. Chapter 1 comments on Christian Education for African Americans in the United States; Chapter 2 provides General Educational Beliefs in Africa and History Highlights of Education in Ancient Egypt; Chapter 3 refers to the Director of Christian Education; Chapter 4 provides Lists for the Director of Christian Education; Chapter 5 discusses How to Develop a Curriculum in the African American Church; Chapter 6 discusses Organizing a Board of Christian Education and Training Ministry Leaders in Christian Education; Chapter 7 provides  Discussions on the English, American, and African American Sunday Church Schools ; and Chapter 8 offers Suggestions for African American Christian Education Programs For The 21st Century. In this book, the terms Director of Christian Education refers to “Minister of Christian Education” and “Sunday school” refers to “church school.” Christian education does much for the African American church. It provides a window for holistic growth from the beginning of one’s spiritual growth. It teaches learners that unity among African Americans is important for survival in the African American community.


Recommended Readings

Sandidge, O. (1998). Teacher -training in the African-American church. Nashville, TN: Sunday School Publishing Board (SSPB).

Dr. Sandidge provides guidelines for creating lesson plans for the church school teacher. This resource provides a new understanding of what the Sunday school is about in methodologies and strategies for teaching. His approach is simple enough for any church school teacher to follow.

Sandidge, O. (1998). I’m stuck! Help me start a youth ministry in the African-American     church. Nashville, TN: SSPB.

This book provides suggestions to youth leaders who might be stuck with youth ministry in the African American church. He provides helpful hints for creating or modifying a youth ministry program.

Sandidge, O. (2001). Beyond the classroom. Nashville, TN: SSPB.

This book presents old, new, and future considerations to help manage, plan, and implement learning experiences in the Christian-classroom. A book that is loaded with suggested skills for training church leaders. Dr. Sandidge also provides an array of suggestions for teacher-in-services or what he calls up-dating one’s skills. 

Sandidge, O. (2001). Strategies for the director of Christian education. Nashville, TN: SSPB.

This book provides the A’B’C’s for the director of Christian education. He teaches about human encounter, personal attitudes, and about community. The book provides models for one to organize the Christian education program in the African American Church

 

MAGAZINES AND JOURNALS

There are numerous journals and magazines where one might find helpful information about Dr. Oneal Sandidge and his views on Christian education.

Sandidge, O. (1992). The uniqueness of black preaching. The Journal of Religious Thought, 49(1). Washington DC: Howard University.

This journal provides Dr. Sandidge’s views for preachers and pastors. He invites both to consider adding classroom discussions prior to or after the sermon. He denotes that Bible-study would be a great time to education parishioners about details not discussed in the sermon.

Sandidge, O. (1992). Tracing gospel roots with Professor Thomas Dorsey. Score Gospel Magazine, 3(1). Nashville, TN.

This journal announces Dr. Sandidge’s teachings about the roots of gospel music. Dr. Sandidge believes that the church is the place to teach the congregation about gospel music. He alludes to using the foundation of gospel as a starting point.

Sandidge, O. (January-February 1992). Black history.  Virginia Education Association Journal.

Sandidge, O. (1991). Book review of book. Black religious leaders–Conflict in unity. Journal of Black Scholars, 22(3). Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin.

Dr. Sandidge had the opportunity to view what others thought about unity. He explored Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcom X and others. He showed comparison of thoughts. He taught that the church educational program should teach about our black leaders


Author Information

Merrill-Jean Bailey

Merrill-Jean Bailey (M.A., English—University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA)is Assistant Professor of English at Atlantic Cape Community College in Mays Landing, New Jersey. The author has served in a variety of Christian education positions including:  General Secretary of the National Baptist Congress of Christian Education, an auxiliary to the National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc.; State Director of Christian Education for the New Jersey General Baptist State Convention; President of the Bethany Baptist Congress and BTU Congress of Southern New Jersey; Regional Director for the National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc. (Sunday School Publishing Board).  Currently the author is the Secretary for the National Advisory Committee of the Sunday School Publishing Board and the Director of Christian Education for the Tabernacle Baptist Church in Burlington, New Jersey.  In addition to a variety of articles published by the Christian Education Informer, a periodical of the National Baptist Convention, the author has a published a book, entitled A Procedural Manual for the Board of Christian Education

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